Learn how heat and air conditioners work.
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Male Speaker: Well this video is going to be about fixing air conditioners, but first I am going to give you a lesson on heat. So that you can understand how air conditioners work and probably a lot of other things. First of all there is no such thing about it is called Creating Cold. Cold is just an effect of removing heat that just means there is less heat. Even when it seems really cold outside it's still away above absolute zero there is still a lot of heat. All the heat that was in the universal originally when the big bang happened you know like fourteen and half billion years ago, and all matter and all space was created is really still here. The heat in the Universe is either just floating around is moving particles about the size of electrons or protons, or it's encapsulated around the neutrons and protons in every atom. In every atom, that's tiniest part in the middle is neutrons and protons and then there is such mass of space like the size of our solar system like in a ratio of the sun in the middle with the distance of whole solar system with all the planets of empty space, which early is in empty its all encapsulated little heat particles trying to get out, so if you split one atom there will be enough heat in air to vaporize your body. When a nuclear bomb goes off in a series of atoms or split in a exponential pattern, then what is happening is the heat that is encased around the electrons orbiting the atom or that least dust particles in the middle is released and that is like probably about 98% heat and about 2% other energies like light and gamma radiation, gamma radiation from all other wavelengths of electromagnetic spectrum. Heat has mass also that means it can be sucked in by a black hole and never escape or it can be bent by passing by a large object with a strong gravitational force. It also has kinetic energy that's how actually heat things up. The kinetic energy of heat works by the fact that these little particles or hitting things, they are hitting the molecules and the little parts of make up everything that we know in see in touch. It's causing those parts to vibrate in the vibration is an increased amplitude of the natural emotion of that molecular atom and that is described as heat. Looking down long roads lane ways desserts whatever with a lot of sun and heat from a distance you get something like a mirage, like a reflection of air or they look like water. Well this is in interference effect. The light protons are coming down of course the speed of light and the heat is also coming down at the same speed, when the short waves hit the ground they change to long waves and then they are reradiated back and when that happens their interfering the particles are colliding, heat particles and light particles making that image. Now heat comes in more than one wavelength. There is long wave, short wave heat, infra red, except a little bit of space in the electromagnetic spectrum. For example when it comes down from the sky, and passes through your windows your car or whatever, it's traveling a short wave. Short waves are good waves that like to penetrate things. That penetrates atmosphere well, penetrates clouds well, stuff like that. Where the problem is when heat passes through glass, through moisture, through carbon-dioxide or some other mediums it's just change the long ray radiation. An long ray radiation does not like to escape very easily through surfaces like this, like glass or in order of the clouds. That's why on a cloudy evening it actually stays warmer, the clouds insulate the earth because the long waves are bouncing up the water particles and coming back to earth and you feeling them. Green house gases like carbon-dioxide and methane, and stuff like that make a very good reflector for heat and that warms our atmosphere little bit more too. For density of our atmosphere actually what retains most of our heat and what makes us feel warm. So if we go up Mount Everest or very high in the sky

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