Learn about Fibromyalgia Video

Learn about Fibromyalgia, a disorder associated with chronic widespread pain and a heightened and painful response to gentle touch. Beth Gottlieb MD Ped Rheumatology www.DrMDK.com
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Interviewer: Fibromyalgia, what is that? Interviewee: Fibromyalgia is not at this moment known to be an autoimmune disease but it is within the field of rheumatology because often it involves fatigue and very diffused body aches and people are concerned that they might have other kinds of more widespread autoimmune disease. So the rheumatologist is usually the one to make that diagnosis. It is not an inflammatory condition but probably more of a condition thought to be related to a sleep disorder and the more that we learn about Fibromyalgia and the more studies that are done, we learned that people who have it have disturb sleep patterns and also have different pain thresholds in the brain. So, some sort of small stimulus would trigger pain and a patient with Fibromyalgia before it within a patient who does not have Fibromyalgia. And the sleepishly comes into play with children specially it is more of a disease of teenagers related to being very busy, sometimes stress having a lot on their minds and a lot of responsibilities and lots of activities and maybe very good things but sometimes this teenagers are overwhelmed and they do not sleep well. And after a few days of having a very poor quality of sleep, they start to be very achy. They are prone to stomach aches, they got headaches very easily and this all makes them feel even worse. And then because they do not feel well, they do not sleep well. And it is not necessarily related to number of hours. I have many patients who tell me they sleep, they could sleep for 12 hours, but they still feel tired, they still feel achy and that is because it is not necessarily how long you sleep, but how well you sleep. And so they can do some very simple things to try to diagnose it base on physical exam, and then we can do some very simple things to try to make it better and most of them do not even involve medication. It really involves trying to help with sleep habits to get better sleep, trying to help relieve some stress and sometimes it as simple as trying to workout which activities are really must important for kids not to overwhelmed them everyday of the week. Interviewer: So, you need to you treat them. They use to treat it? Interviewee: There are some medications they always prefer to hold those until the end and to try to work on changing habits first that you do not have to rely on taking a pill. Now, this is a mixed blessing in some sense because truthfully for teenagers, they rather not change with their habits are that rather just take the magic pill that makes it all better, and it sometimes the tougher argument for us to convince them that by changing some of their habits is a much better way to continue and to get rid of this problem once and for all than to need to rely on their physician and a constant prescription. But there definitely are medications and those choices are things to discuss with their physicians. We do use some different medicines that are use in adults partly because we really want kids to be able to be active and be involved in normal teenage activities.

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