David Meyer MD Pediatric Cardiothoracic Surgeon talks about Cyanosis
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Male Speaker 1: Some kids have blueness but not when they are born later on and is that possible that someone could have missed the fact the kid was some blue and the kid was a newborn and actually had cyanotic heart disease, is that possible? Male Speaker 2: Well, that’s definitely possible. The nature of many of the conditions in general heart disease is that they are progressive. So that for instance tetralogy for which is the commonest type of cyanotic heart disease or heart disease that makes patients blue, frequently will progress in the first three, four, five, six, eight months of life and patients who are born initially with a normal or at least an adequate amount of blood flow to the lungs overtime might in fact develop in adequate amount of blood flow to the lungs as the heart becomes thicker and as certain structures of the heart might not grow properly. So, the fact that a baby is cyanotic or blue eight to six months and is only diagnosed with eight to six months doesn’t necessarily mean that the patient has been cyanotic the whole time.

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