This short video describes the anatomy of the knee, and the main knee injuries.
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I am Josh, medical correspondent. And today, we are talking about the anatomy of and common injuries to the knee. The knee is a joint containing three bones. The first, being the femur or the thigh bone, the patella, which is the knee cap and the tibia, which is the larger bone in the shaft. At the end of each of these bones, the tissue called cartilage which allows for smooth movement within the joint as well as the absorption of shock due to everyday movement. The movement of the knee is governed two muscles in both contained in the thigh. The first, being the quadricep which is the front of the thigh which functions to extend or straighten the leg and the hamstring which is at the back of the thigh and functions to bend the knee or contracts the leg. In addition to the muscles, cartilages and bones in the knee, there are series of tendons and ligaments. The ligaments being the ACL, MCL, QCL, and LCL. The ACL and the MCL are very common sites of injury as we saw in the 2006 football playoffs with Carlson Polly injuring both of those upon hit. The function of the ACL is to sort of stabilize rotation within the knee to prevent the knee from twisting too much limb wire to the other. However, sometimes in sports, you have a foot planted into your body will twist one way or the other such as in basketball when your foot’s palm keep pivoting and what will happen is the ACL will stretch upon this twisting motion and depending on the degree of the stretch, it allowed to be pulled or torn. The same case is true with the MCL, however, rather than providing rotational support, it provides a linear support to the knee. And what happens when you play in contact sports like football or hockey. If you get a large impact to the outside of the knee, what will happen is the MCL will stretch in the same case depending on the degree of the stretch , you will either pull or tear the MCL. So depending on the severity of the injury, the rehabilitation program can take anywhere from two weeks to six months or more if the injury involve surgery. But in many case, the rehabilitation program involves strengthening exercises which allow the muscles and the ligament to regain strength so they can still bring support to the knee. With patience and adherence to strict training regimen outlined by a doctor, a physical therapist. The individual with the injured knee can safely know that their knee will regain strength and they will be able to go back to the active lifestyle that they had before with little concept with instead of the previous knee injury.

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