Dr. William Creasman gives his "bottom line" recap of research into how hormone therapy interacts with cancer.
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I think the data would suggest that certainly the use of hormones five or ten years or something like that, there is no increased risk of breast cancer. If you have a uterus and you have what we call andropause region then there’s an increased risk of endometrial cancer. Today, if a woman still has a uterus almost without exception she’s getting what we call continuous. In other words, she gets progesterone and estrogen everyday. So it’s not the sequential where you take estrogen for the entire month but for only a certain part of the month you take progesterone. That’s probably a mood situation. As I've mentioned there’s protection against colorectal cancer which although the incidents is less than breast cancer, the survival is less and so therefore if you take and look at it and even if you thought there was a risk, even taking a 1:13 2002 in which they said there were three to seven or I think it was, more breast cancer for 10,000 there were 60 less colorectal cancers per 10,000. Six minus eight is two but then you figure what the survival is. There is actually benefit from the prevention of colorectal cancer in what you’ll get from the breast cancer.

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