Learn about blood types and epigenetics and how to base your diet on your blood type
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So Part two, Introduction to the GenoType. GenoType is a corruption of the word Genetic Archetypes and so it's different than the standard genotype, phenotypes thing but it's kind of cool word. I kind of like it and I like the idea of the Genetic Archetypes or Epigenotype is another way of putting it. In essence really what it is, is there is so many processes -- how many ways you can come down a mountain and how many values can there be on a mountain -- the art -- theoretically like I say in the book, you can make a strong case that there should be 7.5 billion GenoTypes, but that's going to be silly because how many things in this world that are done redundantly. We do many things redundantly and it turns out that by the time you do some statistical analysis in term of how many things you can group under the same function, it doesn't take too many. Ultimately, it's like you say, well, tractors can do lots of different things. They can pull stumps out of the ground, they can dig holes, they can drill holes, they can pull rocks, they can chop down trees, but you don't need too many different types of tractors to do all that. You do need a certain type of tractor, maybe tractor needs to be high so that it can go over the tree trucks and tree stumps. The problem with that, maybe it knocks the tips over, because its center gravity is too high. Well maybe, if we make the center gravity lower, but now it can't go over rough terrain. So there are certain constraints that do tell you how many different jobs you need to have done. Physical numbers that tell you, okay, I can't do this with this. And that's again part of this algorithm like approach to these characterization, these epigenetic characterizations. But basically, pass to certain point, it needs 7.5 billion to tell you what is involved in making good tractor. You just maybe need two or three variations. How do you wind up with GenoTypes? You wind up with GenoTypes, you start of first by looking a gene frequencies. The classic genes are well know to the frequencies aren't just about near of the classic serological genes. By that I might mean blood types, testatrix, haplotypes, HLA antigenes, any of those things, a hemoglobin type, haptoglobin types. They are all published and we have not only the publish frequencies, but we have demographics with regard to key populations and frequencies. These are extracted from our work of a great brilliance called History and Geography of Human Genes by Cavalli Sforza. That's generally where you could start it. I mean, you can go into looking this is another keynote work which was Cummins Fingerprints Palms and Soles, and you wind up, okay, here is fingerprint pattern that co-relate to blood groups, here are fingerprints patterns that co-relate to nationality, here are fingerprints occurrences on the particular fingers that co-relate to -- so what you are trying to do is weave this holistic approach to the data that allows you to understand based upon those structures that I don't want to do the same thing twice. Now again this is not a luxuriant and statistic, but if you can understand this key premise, you will understand how we got six, which is that if you look what's called multivariate analysis. Multivariate analysis is statistical tool that lets you take multidimensional data and crunch it down and you crunch it down by essentially trying to find what are called eigenvalues which are direction through the data that particular direction and capitulates the most amount of variants. So that if I drew the line through the data, any other way, I would have less variants in that line. Then, you then make a determination that's called orthogonal to that, which means that now by mathematical rules if this is my vector that has maximum variants, at 90 degrees will be the next component of that data, and that's called principal component analysis. That's the basis of most of these characterizations. Now of course, I won't tell you, I did

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