Learn about Blood Types and Epigenetics - part 3 Video

Learn about blood types and epigenetics - part 3
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We talked about that, Placenta. It turns out that actually -- the placenta which is really one of the unsung parts of the human anatomy, is sort of gets tossed after birth and some people read it I think, at least some read it. But basically, it's kind of like you evil twin when you were born. Your placenta really was like -- it was like your big brother who would beat up on you when your parents weren't looking, it was kind of like the Eddie Haskell of your fetal period. Because in essence, your placenta always gets first dibs on everything, so the placenta is the first to get the oxygen and placenta is first to get the glucose, the placenta is first to get all the nutrients, proteins, it regulates acidity. After its happy, then the rest goes to the embryo. So it's a very interesting dynamic, the embryo is at the end of a tabor with the placenta that was essentially almost acting as what we call in engineering terms, a Transducer. It's transmitting the mother's elements into fetal things but it's taking its tax, it's taking its total things. Well things that basically go on to encourage variations in placental function are major influences on epigenetic gene regulation. So the placenta is a major epigenetic organ because much of that programming -- now you got the gene, so now we are going to basically set it for you, is done at this level and this of course, is where often society really fell, this is where people often smoke and drink and don't eat well, and all sorts of things. I know some of you guys are dietitians and stuff, right? You are to the French paradox, right? Like French people don't get heart diseases and stuff? Everybody though maybe it's the wine they drink, maybe it's the what that they drink -- it turns out since the Franco-Prussian, the French Government has had a very aggressive policy of infant, maternal and prenatal nutrition. So for instance, if you happened to be a pregnant mother in France or young child, the government gives you incredible amounts of high quality food and that's probably the epigenetic effect that makes French people later on so resistant, to the same effects that other people who were not prepared the same way, and think about 1871. So that's a few generations they have been doing this. You can think that, that improvement has been epigenetically programmed into those people over several generations. Thrifty phenotype is the human version of the agouti mouse. This came out of a study that was done in Holland where they analyzed during World War II, Dutch people that starved. The Dutch had a tremendous famine in World War II, and they starved -- many people starved to death. They went back and looked at the record keeping that the Dutch took at that time, and looked at the offspring that were conceived, carried or born during that hunger period after or during World War II. When they follow them later on, they discovered high rates of autism, and high rates of hypertension, schizophrenia, heart diseases, diabetes and cancer. Not even necessarily in a generation that was following the one that was born after the famine, but in that generation afterwards. And this was posited essentially as something called as thrifty phenotype. They say that the maternal environment reflected a condition as almost as if the mother could program the fetus in a way that said, it's terrible out there. Optimize all your assimilation functions because it's famine, there is a starvation environment out there. So the fetus be gets programmed for thriftiness. So if you won't understand what that means, think about a thrifty person when it comes to finances, right. A thrifty person who is financially thrifty saves all his money. Or the thrifty person metabolically saves all the calories. So where is the disconnect? What happens when your program for thriftiness prenatally, but you come out into a post world war -- post world war, is the thriftiness. If anything the Dutch eat more fat, more useless calories t

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