Learn about blood types and epigenetics - part 1
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Do you have ever looked at a picture of a chromosome? It looks like a squiggly worm and it has got bunch of lines through it. It's like stripes. Those stripes are what are called Chromatin bands, and chromatin bands come from the fact that the DNA in that location is tightly wound together, which means that there is a tremendous amount of actual genetic activity versus the vast majority of the gene which does absolutely nothing. Those areas of chromatin striping are very highly charged areas. So if you can think of -- probably for instance, maybe you don't know this, but 90% of your DNA does absolutely nothing. Okay, 4% of your DNA made you, and 5% of your DNA is a bunch of inactivated -- what's called retrovirus codes. In other words, it's virus codes that are still inside you, that got turned off millions of years ago, but it turns out more into your genetics are virus codes that got turned off, that enter you, and turns out the ninth-tenths of your genetics does absolutely nothing. So it's like going to Amazon and buying a CD that's got one song and then 55 minutes of wide noise, that's what it turns out to be. So when we find those areas of banding, it means, hey this is the real stuff, this is the real person here, not the virus, the DNA, not the nothing DNA. Well, if you look at the area where ABO is on chromosome nine, it's called band q34, highly dense, highly highly configured. There is a lot of genetic activity that comes out of that particular locus of that gene, that goes and regulates a variety of other cell functions. So you see we have illusion to it, hey that's not a bad place. People are routinely different over here. Let me code a few other things to happen when this happens. And that's why people, a lot of times don't get at blood type that much because they don't realize that when they go back to their education in medical school and they uncover that blood type -- there is something on a red blood cell, they are only getting 1/25th of the story. Your blood type is all over the place. It's in your tears, it's in your semen, it's in your vaginal secretion, it's in your digestive tract, it's lining your stomach, it's coding how you response to stress, it's coding basically how viscous your blood is when you are stressed out, it codes your resistance to bacteria, viruses, it codes basically how you breakdown the material in your gut. What bacteria live in your gut? So there is a lot about blood type that really gives the name blood type, it's a misnomer, because it really was given the name blood type because it is given this role in transfusion, but it's given the name because of its clinical role not because of its biological significance. And yet when somebody who is in health care goes -- well blood types don't really matter, you might as well pick an astrological sign, you don't really know the wider significance. More of your blood type is embedded in the lining of your digestive tract than it is on your red blood cells, right, but we don't transfuse intestinal tracts between ourselves, so we don't call it intestinal type. We call it blood type. This is what I learned in my evolution through the whole thing is that actually, if you have an interesting idea that's in variance with the common understood knowledge, in other words, what's considered to be the knowledge on the subject, it's easier for people to just say, well that's ridiculous than it is for them to be curious and maybe take the concept further. So the second lesson that I have learned is that often with scepticism. It is actually somebody who is not internally very curious, because there were lots of examples to educate people a vital role that blood type, had nobody took them up unless you went to a conference that we threw or you got into reading some of the references. I actually had somebody who wrote me one time who was a medical doctor a several years ago, he said I was getting ready to write a critical thing on your book, and then

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