Learn about Bee Stings Therapy Video

Chris Kleronomos specializes in bee sting therapy, or apitherapy, and says that bee venom is an excellent remedy for conditions like multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis and gout. Dr. Travis volunteers to get stung!
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Travis Stork: Joining us is Chris Kleronomos; he is a doctor of oriental medicine. He practices this bee-sting therapy, also known as apitherapy. He is going to show us how it works and I have to tell you, I am willing to take the plunge for science, but I am scared of these things. Chris Kleronomos: No, no, no. This is actually very safe. It's been used for thousands of years and it's only going to hurt for a second. I am not going to say it's not going to hurt, but it will only hurt for a minute. I am not sure if it's a good idea to sting the only ER physician here without a test, but we will -- Travis Stork: So the ice will help desensitize the area. Chris Kleronomos: Correct. What we do is, we -- obviously, if you were a patient, we will -- if you were a patient -- Travis Stork: Hey buddy, be nice to me, alright. Chris Kleronomos: There is the little guy. So if you were a patient, we would come in and evaluate to make sure you weren't allergic. We'd select their spots and go ahead and sting. So you told me about your knee, the ice is there. It will hurt a little bit. Travis Stork: I have like a phobia of these things. Chris Kleronomos: Now, don't worry. Travis Stork: You can stick an eel to my knee, I would have no problems. Chris Kleronomos: There we go! Just relax. There we go, and that's all, folks. Lisa Masterson: Is that it? Jim Sears: Is that it? Chris Kleronomos: That's it. There you go! Lisa Masterson: Wow! Good job!

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