Lean about the Benefits of Using a Pacifier Video

The Go-To Mom explains the benefits of using a pacifier with your baby/toddler.
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Binky Patrol If you think your child is going to go up to college with this in his mouth, think again!! Children usually give up the pacifier by age three and as they get older peer pressure begins to set in and that might be incentive enough for them to give up their valued paci. A pacifier provides a serene state of calm for infants and young children. The American Academy of Pediatrics state that a pacifier can actually prevent SIDS. Sucking on a pacifier forces the airway to stay open. Pacifier use is now recommended at nap time and bed time throughout the first year of life. A binky or a pacifier is also a transitional object that helps to relieve stress as children adopt a new situation. If you are concerned about prolonged pacifier use, here are tips on how to slowly decrease pacifier dependency. When giving your baby a pacifier always pair it with a satin trimmed blanket or stuffed animal. So that when they give up the pacifier they still have other comfort objects. Limit the use of pacifiers to the bed and car only. Work out a deal with your child that the pacifier cannot travel or leave the house. Cut one millimeter off the top of every pacifier in the house. When he discovers the broken pacifier do not replace it. Instead, simply explain that it's broken. Most toddlers will decide on their own that they no longer want it. Have a party to give the pacifier away to a new baby. Sow it onto a favorite stuffed animal. Tie it to balloons and have a launching ceremony (tell them the balloons will take it to a new born baby who needs it). According to the American Academy of Pediatrics Dentistry Policy on Oral Habits, thumb sucking and pacifier use are normal in infants and young children.

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