Knee Injury Causes and Treatments Video

Recent media attention has focused on the ACL injury of pro-golfer, Tiger Woods. In this video you'll learn what activities typically cause these injuries, as well as treatment options.
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Male: Well, I think it’s going to hurt the game a little bit from the spectators’ standpoint. I think it’s going to lose a little bit of fan interest. Rebecca Fox: It’s a popular topic of conversation both on and off the green, Tiger Woods’ early exit from the 2008 PGA Tour Season due to injuries. He has an anterior cruciate ligament or ACL injury to his left knee and a double stress fracture of his left tibia. Male: He has proven himself to sit out with that knee, heal back to where it should be and then he’ll be ready to go again. Rebecca Fox: Woods announced on his website, he will undergo reconstructive surgery for his ruptured ACL. Male: Torn ACL there and a torn ACL. Rebecca Fox: It’s estimated that doctors perform 100,000 ACL reconstructions each year in the United States. Experts say that this injury is typically seen among contact sports and those that involve a lot of jumping, cutting and pivoting movements. Male: It’s not an overuse wear and tear type injury, it’s a traumatic event type of injury. People typically either landing from a jump where they go to turn, you know, they plant their foot and go to turn and their foot stays and their knee buckles, they feel a loud pop on their knee and it gives way. Rebecca Fox: Orthopedic Surgeon David Geier who does not treat Woods explains that while non-surgical treatments such as physical therapy or an option for some less active patients, higher level athletes usually go under the knife. David Geier: What you have to do is take out the torn ACL and make a new one either the middle part of the patella tendon or the ham string tendons or even using a graft from a cadaver that you make a new ACL. Rebecca Fox: As for rehabilitation time, Dr. Geier says, “That varies from person to person and from sport to sport.” Another factor to consider is whether other injuries were sustained. David Geier: The problem with ACL surgery is that it’s usually about anywhere from five to six months to get back to sports. It’s a lot of physical therapy getting the motion back initially and then working on getting your strength back and then starting to get back into sport specific functional activities. It’s a long process to get back to sports after an ACL surgery. Rebecca Fox: A long process but a high success rate depending on several factors. It’s estimated that patients treated with surgical reconstruction of the ACL have long-term success rates of 82% to 95%. David Geier: So it’s very reliable given that they had a good surgery and probably more importantly, very good rehab. Rebecca Fox: All reassuring news for fans of Tiger Woods. Male: I mean, he’s unbelievable. He’s great. That’s why you watch the game is watch athletes like that. So yeah, we’re going to miss him of course, but nothing is more than his part there. Rebecca Fox: For more information on ACL injuries and treatment, visit ICYOU.com. for ICYOU, I’m Rebecca Fox.

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