An ancient type of group chanting called Kirtan is giving participants a deep sense of well-being. No singing skills or religious beliefs are required.
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Male Speaker: This may not seem like a place where people who work on Wall Street would hang out, but it's where day and other often unwind after a long day. What's going on here is called Kirtan, an ancient Hindu practice that's helping people cope with the modern world. Male Speaker: It's chanting, chanting Sanskrit and it's a music, the combination of the things brings you, at least it brings me into a place where I'm very happy. Male Speaker: In United States Kirtans are often performed at Yoga or Wellness centers and are open to people of all faiths and backgrounds. Male Speaker: Kirtan is simple a child can do it, the old infirm person, anybody can chant. Kamaniya Devi: You don't need to have a whole band and a sound system to have Kirtan. Traditionally Kirtan is either in temples, or in people's homes, but of course you know, we're in the West and so we have to get a little more structured. Male Speaker: Kamaniya Devi Devi left her job in the fashion industry for a new career path as a Kirtanist. Kamaniya Devi: It got in my heart and very quickly I became rapidly addicted. Male Speaker: Research shows that chanting may slow heart rate, increase blood oxygen levels and boost brain chemicals that affect mood. Kamaniya Devi: It's very spiritual, it grounds you, it's very healing. Male Speaker: My mind is very quiet, it's very, it's a great feeling. Yeah, it's a wonderful Friday night. Male Speaker: And for some the way to end the stressful work week on a high note. Male Speaker: Blissful, happy, aesthetic, however you want to put it, just you know joyful.

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