Keeping Children Breathing Video

This health video will focus on how to help are baby to breath when they are having difficulties.
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Jennifer Mathews: When Taylor Reiner cried as a toddler, she wasn't like other babies. Sometimes she was so angry and upset, she would pass out. DeeDee Reiner: There was times that it was just a normal cry, I didn't get my way or whatever and it was fine, but it was when this certain cry and it's hard to explain, but when this certain cry came it would be Craig she's going to have another one, you just know it was happening. Jennifer Mathews: DeeDee Reiner and her husband Craig knew Taylor was having another breath-holding episode. Taylor's heart rate would slow down, leaving her limp and glassy-eyed. The Reiner's sought help at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Co-burn Porter: They usually are provoked by some type of anger or frustration or pain, where they'll start to cry, sometimes they don't even get out one breath of crying and they stop breathing. Jennifer Mathews: For severe cases like Taylor's, Dr. Porter implants a small pacemaker with a sensor set at a certain level. Co-burn Porter: If we had it set at maybe 60 beats per minute for a younger child - as soon as the heart rate would spontaneously go below 60 beats a min it would come on and pace at perhaps 60 or even 70 beats a minute. Jennifer Mathews: The pacemaker doesn't stop Taylor from playing hockey. In fact, she hardly notices it. Taylor Reiner: I really don't feel it, but sometimes I just remember that it's there, otherwise I really don't notice that it's there. Jennifer Mathews: But her parents know it's there and they know it works. DeeDee Reiner: We knew with that cry if she wouldn't have had that pacemaker she would've had a seizure. Jennifer Mathews: This is Jennifer Mathews reporting.

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