Learn how to know if your 4 month old is normal, by Henry Joseph Hasson, MD Pediatric Neurologist Children’s Hospital at Montefiore Medical Education: Albert Einstein College of Medicine.
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Host: Four month old, the key time. One, because the kid have any social smile. Tell us what is the social smile? Henry Joseph Hasson: So that maybe they'll start smiling if you smile at them, and the mother especially makes them comfortable, they will smile back. Sometimes they will even start smiling spontaneously in this age when they're just happy and comfortable. Host: They laugh a little bit? Henry Joseph Hasson: Sure. Host: They should make eye contact. They should look at you, not around you, not the ceiling, at you sometimes, shouldn't they? Henry Joseph Hasson: Yeah, especially people that they recognize, especially the mom or the people that are around them in their house. They want to look at them and be comforted by them at that age. Host: There is a big question out that we should screen kids for autism, and I look at video tape sometimes, and I think it's a good idea, for the children who have reached two months and four months, looking for that eye contact. It doesn't mean that your kid has a problem but it's a good thing to look at, to see if the kid has a social smile spontaneous laughter, looks for the mother or the father. Henry Joseph Hasson: Right. Host: That's very important, and a head lag is just about, totally gone with every baby, is that true? Henry Joseph Hasson: Yeah, by this point, it should be able to -- he should be able to start sitting them up and holding them with support and they should be able to hold their head up within that position. Some babies will start even being able to control their trunk and start sitting up. Host: If you had a kid, they called you up, they are a little concerned about the drawback what would be asking and I am saying, because today we tried to pick kids in an early intervention problems. What would you be looking for -- someone called you up and say, like I am going to my pediatrician, there's a little concern. What questions would you ask using this kids to be maybe looked at? Henry Joseph Hasson: So by this age they are really like we discussed, they should start really looking at the mom. They should be comfortable with her. They should turn at the sound. They should be comfortable by the mom's sound, a lot of times when the baby is crying, and the mom can console them, singing and things like that, and they like to be held. They like to be cuddled, these are all signs of a healthy baby. Host: So a good socialization. Good interaction. They want the mother. They want -- there would probably be that the kid never wanted to be held, is that be bother you a little bit? Henry Joseph Hasson: Yeah, it could be. That could be concerning, and again, this is an early age, and it's difficult to tell exactly what's making the baby uncomfortable. They can't tell us what the problem is, but if they are not having any social interactions, and are not looking at mom, they are not focusing, they are not hearing things, here are the things that are concerning. You might do some tests. Make sure that things are going okay. Maybe like we said, some early intervention to help, those up their skills. Sometimes it's typically just be the environment that they are in, they are not being stimulated enough for that, they are not being comfortable properly, and sometimes it's just an education where the mom an help with that. Host: I am at different side of fence, somebody's early intervention people. I was like a developmental pediatrician or pediatrologist to look at the kids and saying, we should refer the kid out, because many times early intervention the evaluators are masters in social work. Henry Joseph Hasson: Right. Host: I don't say that they are bad, but they don't have the same background as we do. Henry Joseph Hasson: Right. They don't have the same training skills in really identifying what the problem is. They can identify when there is a certain problem, and they can do some physical therapy or language therapy, but it's important to understand why the baby has this pr

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