Is Coffee Healthy Video

Are the java jitters a hazard to your heart? Is a two cup-a-day habit dangerous? Our healthy skeptic separates myths from facts.
Read the full transcript »

Female Speaker: I really enjoy coffee and it's kind of I crave it everyday, but I'm just a little bit concerned about those health risks taking along there. Female Speaker: Well, I heard on the news that too much coffee is unhealthy, but then in other news report that it actually might have health benefit. So, I don't really know what to think. Robert Davis: There is certainly lots of confusion over coffee. For years there have been warnings that may lead to a host of health problems ranging from dehydration to cancer, but it turns out those fear by in large are groundless. Male Speaker: It's true that caffeine and coffee can raise your heart rate and increase blood pressure temporarily. But study show coffee doesn't increase the risk of heart attack or stroke. In fact it's been associated with slightly lower risk, ditto for Type II diabetes and Parkinson's disease. According to studies coffee drinkers are less likely to develop both compare to non-drinkers. The research on cancer is reassuring as well. Coffee doesn't increase risk and is actually linked to lower odds of liver cancer. Overall research shows drinkers live just as long as those who stay and maybe even longer. One possible reason for coffees apparent benefit is that is antioxidants. So that is not making it a health drink. Higher amounts of coffee can cause jitters and stomach upset and more than a cup or two a day is been linked to miscarriages in some research. Robert Davis: Bottom line coffee in moderation is up to a few cups a day is likely fine for most people, but be careful about those fancy coffees of all the extra ingredients which can add lots of calories. After all you want the cup of jolt to perk you up not weigh you down. Helping you would be a healthy skeptic, I'm Robert Davis.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement