Intel Core i7's Energy Efficiency Video

On the Green Show this week, Intel touts the efficiency of its new chips paired with Windows 7, MIT tracks your trash, and Google wants to fly you to Copenhagen.
Read the full transcript »

Mark: Hey, I'm Mark Licea and this week, Microsoft and Intel get more efficient. MIT excites with trash track. And Google wants to pay for your trip to Copenhagen. The Green Show starts now. Windows 7 is coming out in just a few weeks along with a whole new line of PCs, and in those new machines? New chipoes. Our own Natalie Del Conte spoke with Intel on how they’re new hardware will make Windows 7 run better. Take a look. Natalie: Thanks Mark. I'm here with Brian Fravel from Intel and he is going to tell us about how Windows 7 and Intel can help make your laptop more energy efficient. So tell me about how Intel is working with Microsoft to make Windows 7 experience better? Brian: Microsoft has written their software to take specific advantage of our feature. We did a demo back in our lab in Santa Clara with Microsoft, where we had a high end Core 7 system. It had a solid state drive on it. And we we’re able to boot it up from cold in just 11 seconds. Natalie: So how does an Intel chip make Windows 7 more energy efficient then? Brian: Now we’re able base on what you were doing on the computer to actually turn the lights off in individual houses. So if which you are using only requires one or two cords, we’ll turn the other ones off. The net result as an end user is that the processor’s using less energy, but more important for laptop user, your battery life last longer. And we've seen anywhere from 10-20% energy saving using our latest Core processor and Microsoft’s Windows 7. Natalie: Well, thank you for that, back to you Mark. Mark: Thanks Natalie. A few months back, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology began an experiment to track trash using RFID tags. The purpose is to help consumers visualize where trash goes once it’s picked up. The program release around 3000 of these electronic tags that report location data in real time. The company waste management is funding the study to examine how waste systems can operate more efficiently. The actual result don’t sound too exciting, but for the purposes of the show, let's try. A plastic soap container gets picked up on 51st and Madison. The container then travelled south several blocks before heading west ward, gets loop around twice. It then reaches the west end of Manhattan proceeding to cross the Lincoln tunnel into New Jersey. Yeah, sorry, we got kind of bored. And shouldn’t a plastic bottle get recycled anyway? But if you care to check out the exhibition or find out more information, visit senseable.mit.edu/trashtrack. Moving right along, representatives around the world are gathering at the end of the year in Copenhagen for the UN climate change convention. And Google wants you to be a part of it. Google Earth will launch a series of layers and tours where you can visualize the possible impact of climate change can have on the earth. The company unveiled its first climate tour narrated by Al Gore. Al: During these tours, you will also learn about the range of available solutions. You will visualize a new world of renewable energy. Mark: Google also opening a channel on YouTube where anyone could submit questions and thoughts on the subject. The initiative is called Raise Your Voice, and videos submitted will be watched and rated on by viewers on the channel. As for its incentive, the top two submissions win a trip to Copenhagen. Have you ever wanted to gather a huge collection of recyclables and then sell them off for profit? Yeah, of course you have. eCycler is a new site that lets you do just that. The site also connects users with people looking to get rid of their recyclables. eCycler will point you in the direction of a facility that will exchange your recyclables for cash. You do have to pay a small fee for every lead that the user gets to the site. If you're too cheap to pay the fee, craigslist works. Or if that’s too dangerous, maybe a dark city back alley. That’s it for this week, write to us greenshow@cnet.com. I'm Mark Licea, thanks for watching.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement