Inhaled Chemo Video

In this medical video learn about a new twist on standard chemotherapy, which offers less side effects and better precision.
Read the full transcript »

Jennifer Matthews: Cheryl Hatton is living a parent's worst nightmare. Cheryl Hatton: She used to tell me that she wished she died because it hurt too much, all the time. Jennifer Matthews: Her 17-year-old daughter Rebecca has Osteosarcoma, a rare bone cancer that spread to her lungs and required aggressive chemotherapy. Rebecca West: It's a little hard because I'm a girl and losing your hair is not fun, and being away from school and friends is a little hard. Cheryl Hatton: It's like watching someone torture your child week after week. Jennifer Matthews: But now Rebecca is trying a new type of chemo. It's inhaled instead of given through an IV. A tent is used, so the chemo doesn't get in the atmosphere. Dr. Richard Gorlick: Inhalation chemotherapy is a means of targeting chemotherapy that it goes selectively to the lungs and has much lower concentrations in the blood stream. Jennifer Matthews: More chemo reaches the cancer cells, but patients experience fewer side effects. So far, it's shrunk Rebecca's tumor. Rebecca West: I get a little nauseous. Jennifer Matthews: The drug being inhaled is Cisplatin. For the clinical trial, it's being inhaled and given through an IV. Dr. Richard Gorlick: You couldn't use this as a replacement yet, but hopefully in the future. Rebecca West: I try to be positive on it because you don't always want to be negative about it all the time and feeling sorry for yourself. Jennifer Matthews: It's that attitude that keeps Rebecca's mom strong as she watches with hope. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement