Improving Brain Surgery Video

This medical video will focus on the advancements being made in brain surgery.
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Jennifer Mathews: This bulky room-sized magnet an MRI takes a picture of the brain. Steve Nelson had one after a car accident to check for bleeding on the brain. Steve Nelson: Mr. Nelson, we have good news, there's no bleeding on the brain, bad news is you have a rather large mass in your brain. Jennifer Mathews: Steve can laugh now, but a few months ago he was facing a procedure that could have left him partially paralyzed. Steve Nelson: Anytime you're on the brain stem, particularly on the side it was, it would have affected my mobility, even my strength on the left side of my body. Jennifer Mathews: Normally, surgeons use MRI images taken before the operation. But the brain can move during surgery making the pictures inaccurate. Johnny Delashaw: Sometimes these tumors look just like brain to the naked eye, and you can't tell the difference when you're operating. Jennifer Mathews: With a new MRI, doctors at Oregon Health and Science University can take pictures during surgery. The real-time pictures offer a better roadmap. Johnny Delashaw: As we gotten to the cyst, if we were worried about where we were, or how accurate we could be, we just take another image, boom, we're accurate again. Jennifer Mathews: Thanks to the new MRI, Steve's operation was a success. His vision is fine, and so is his hitting arm. This is Jennifer Mathews reporting.

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