This health video is taking a look at the latest prostate treatments available.
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Jennifer Matthews: Three years ago, Ed Gross joined the growing number of men diagnosed with prostate cancer. Ed Gross: We sat down in his office and he said 'You know, don't have good news for you. We did find a small malignancy.' Hearing the words, it was a shock. Jennifer Matthews: Ed was leary of the possible side effects of standard treatments: impotence and incontinence. Ed Gross: I had just turned 58, and I felt I had a lot of life to live yet and I wanted that quality. Jennifer Matthews: In his search for alternative options, Ed found doctor Gary Onik and a procedure called cryosurgery. Dr. Gary Onik: It's a minimally invasive procedure. You don't have to cut the patient open to do it. You can place the probes that freeze the prostate through the skin, and we can monitor that placement using radiology. Jennifer Matthews: While the procedure itself is not uncommon, doctor onik's approach is. Dr. Gary Onik: You can think of this middle-ground type of treatment as a lumpectomy for men. Jennifer Matthews: Doctors can now freeze only the diseased portion of the prostate rather than the whole gland. The result? The nerves involved in sexual function are spared. Dr. Gary Onik: It's not been done before. So far in the study that we've published and presented, we're talking about 80 percent of our men being potent afterwards. Jennifer Matthews: And none of the patients has experienced incontinence. Ed is grateful for the new technique. Ed Gross: I look at it maybe as a pothole in the highway of life. Jennifer Matthews: Now His Eyes Are Set On The Road Ahead. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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