This health video focuses on how to detect learn problems earlier and what help is available.
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Jennifer Matthews: Enid Mattimiro quizzes her 15-year-old daughter, Sarah. Sarah is a good student, but when she was younger, she struggled. Enid Mattimiro: When she would count she would always go: 10, 11, 12, 13 15, and it's like I couldn't figure out why she never said 14. Jennifer Matthews: It turns out Sarah had trouble processing sound, but it took awhile to figure that out. Had a new test called bio-map been around when Sarah was in grade school, her problem could have been diagnosed much quicker. Three electrodes are used to monitor the brain's response to a pattern of sounds that children hear while watching a movie. Researchers get results almost immediately. Based on brain wave patterns, researchers can tell whether the child accurately processes the sound. Nina Kraus: The black line represents a response from a normal child, and the red line is from a child with a reading problem. The child with the reading problem has a delay on the order of fractions of milliseconds. Jennifer Matthews: But Kraus says that's enough to make learning difficult for children like Sarah. That's why early detection is key. Sarah knows that first-hand. Sarah Mattimiro: It just makes it easier to figure out what the problem is and like how to cope with it. Jennifer Matthews: Now, the Mattimiros are doing just fine. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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