Identifying Childhood Anxiety Video

In this medical health video Dr. Daniel Pine, Chief of Child and Adolescent Research in the Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program of the National Institute of Mental Health, describes the conditions under which childhood anxiety warrants professional...
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Female Speaker: These days, anxiety seems to be a natural part of life. Even children feel the stresses of a fast paced world. But how does a parent know if their child is experiencing something more serious than a case of the butterflies. At a recent public symposium held by NARSAD, The Mental Health Research Association, experts gathered to discuss mental health issues relating to children and adolescents. Dr. Daniel Pine, Chief of the Child and Adolescent Research Program, within the Mood and Anxiety Program at the National Institute of Mental Health, shared his research on childhood anxiety. Dr. Daniel Pine: In terms of giving advice to parents, probably the most important things that parents should think about is, to what extent does the anxiety that a child is having, interfere with what that child has to do in life. So, in any child who is having, what we call impairment, or interference with the degree to which that child can function. So, children who can't go on play dates, children who are having trouble going to school, children whose parent's can't go out at night, because their children get too upset. In those circumstances, parents should think that it's really time that I talk to a competent mental health professional to think about whether my child may or may not have a problem, that could be helped by the various kinds of treatments.

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