Jane Bogart teaches you what you need to know about condoms and sexually transmitted diseases.
Read the full transcript »

Condoms are incredibly affective in preventing the transmission of STIs or STDs. They're a great barrier method, they protect you skin to skin, they protect the transmission of infectious fluid. Although no method is a hundred percent affective, this is the best protection that you can have from STIs or STDs. So I'm going to talk you through how to use a condom. So the first thing you want to do is actually have a condom and the one thing you want to make sure when you have a condom that a, you store it in the right place, and that means a cool, dry place, so bad places for condoms, dashboard of your car, in your wallet, anywhere where it's hot and sunny, not great to put them in the freezer or the refrigerator, just want to store them in a nice cool dry place. And b, you want to make sure that your condoms haven't expired. So most condoms are good for about five years and you want to check the expiration date which is on the package of each condom to make sure that your condoms have not expired, lets say, oh, yesterday. The way you know a condom has not been pre-opened or compromised in some way is that you'll have an air bubble in the condom so you'll be able to actually feel air in the condom, a resistance, if the condom has actually been opened in some way, you won't be able to feel that air bubble. Most condoms have a serrated edge where they join together and that provides you a really great way to open them. You want to push the condom to the side, try not to use your teeth because that can actually rip the condom, just use your fingers, you open the condom up and you take it out. When you take the condom out of the package you'll notice that it's rolled up and there is a correct and incorrect way to roll the condom down. The correct way is that the rim is on the outside or the condom, and we always say that it kind of looks like you have a little hat. When you have the rim on the inside it looks a little bit more like a peeny. If you start to put the condom on the wrong way and you find out that it's the wrong way, then you should throw the condom away and start with a new one because what's happened is you have potentially infectious fluid that was on the inside of the condom that now will be on the outside of the condom and that's not a good thing. So once you've determined that your condom rim is on the outside, you want to pinch the top of the condom so that the ejaculate has some place to go. If it doesn't have a place to go it can push the condom off the penis or it can cause the condom possibly to rip or tear. So you want to leave room at the top, you have the rim on the outside, you roll the condom all the way down the shaft, to the bottom of the shaft of the penis, all the way to the end and you want to make sure that it's nice and snug on the end, but that there's room on the top or the condom so that the ejaculate has somewhere to go and then you do whatever you normally do with your penis. When you're done and you're withdrawing from the orifice, you want to make sure that you hold the bottom of the condom and you withdraw carefully, take the condom off and you just twist it and throw it somewhere that you don't have to be in touch with the fluid, that doesn't get found. Please do not flush it down the toilet, it actually clogs drains. So when you're done with the condom, you are done. It's a one use only item, you through it out and its gone. If you're going to start another activity that requires a latex barrier, you get a brand new condom. So that's sort of your basic how to use a condom.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement