Learn what to do if a child ingests a poisonous chemical.
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How to Treat Child Poisoning from Chemicals Travis: Every single day, nearly 2,000 people are treated in emergency departments for accidental poisonings. More than half of those are children under the age of 6. So, I want everyone to take out your Padgett gadgets once again and answer this question, “If your child accidentally swallowed a poisonous substance, should you one, give them milk, two, induce vomiting, three, give them milk and induce vomiting, or four, none of the above?” So, go ahead and log your vote. Let's see how smart our audience is. You can't fool this audience, 44% said none of the above and the correct answer is four, none of the above. But what should you do? James: What you should do is immediately call Poison Control. If your child gets any substance that you don’t know what it is whether it’s a cleaner or a medication, call Poison Control. The number is easy to remember, 1-800-222-1222. They are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and they have toxicology expert standing by. They can speak to you in 150 different languages. As a matter of fact, don’t call your doctor’s office. Don’t call the ER. Call Poison Control because on that video, it was Terro. I don’t know what that is. If they called my office, I’d have to call Poison Control for that. Andrew: And when you call, try to have as much information as you possibly can as far as what was it to the best of your knowledge, how long did it happen. James: And if they tell you to go to the ER, take the bottle with you. Lisa: And prevention tips, make sure you keep your prescriptions or medications in the original bottle because there are a lot of medications that look similar and you may think that you're taking one thing and actually, you're taking another and that causes some accidental poisoning or you won't be able to tell the doctor exactly what you take. Also, try not to put your medications even though these seemed very convenient. Don’t make them colorful because they become very eye catching to little kids. So, you want to make sure you keep them in the original container. And also, never give medication in the dark. A lot of times moms are sleepy and they got to go give medications to kids or things like that in the middle of the night. But make sure you see exactly what you're giving because again, some things look very similar. You may think you're giving one thing and you're actually giving another. James: Let me show you some good examples of that. See all these things here? Half of these are just harmless juices and candies. The other half is actually medications. This first row, this is a cough syrup. It looks just like this juice, like you said, if it’s in the middle of the night, its dark. This is a children’s multivitamin and this is candy. So, you can see how these are really easily confused; calcium chew chocolate; aspirin, mints. Travis: Tell people Doctor Sears; you know what eating a handful of vitamin chews may not be the best thing for you. James: Its not. Travis: They’re vitamins. James: Right, but vitamin in its correct dose is good for you. But it’s very easy to overdose on some of these things especially like vitamin A. Lisa: And there’s chocolate laxative. If you take all bunch of that, that’s not a good thing. James: And that’s another good reason why to never call medicine candy or juicy. A lot of parents say “It’s candy.” Just to get the kids to take it, bad idea. Another thing, you should make sure that every medication is stored up high out of the way, cabinets are baby-proofed and that goes for cleaners too because these things are really, really nasty. Travis: And the less toxic substances you keep in your house, the better off—use as far as your small children because if you give into the cabinet and you get something that’s relatively non-toxic, you're kids obviously are going to be safer, so that’s another reason to green up your cleaning supplies in my personal opinion.

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