Stephanie Lydecker and Linda Cobb show you how to create all natural laundry spotter and stain removers in order to tackle the toughest of laundry stains.
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How to Remove Tough Laundry Stains with Natural Products Stephanie Lydecker: Do you have clothes line when you’re washing with stains and you don’t know how to remove? Well, today we will wash away that problem because the queen of clean, Linda Cobb is here to help us do just that. Hi. Linda Cobb: Hi Steph, how are you today? Stephanie Lydecker: Wonderful. It’s so good to see you. Linda Cobb: Good to see you too. Stephanie Lydecker: You know I think your laundry is very seriously. Linda Cobb: This is going to be a very good subject for you today. Stephanie Lydecker: Okay. So we’re doing stain removal with natural products. Linda Cobb: Things that you can make at home that are specific to the stains, inexpensive to make and pretty safe and natural first used around our kids and families. Stephanie Lydecker: Great! Linda Cobb: Okay, the first one we’re going to talk about is an all purpose stain remover. And I always recommend you that you label your bottles carefully because you always want to know what’s in it. That’s when I saw symbol. All we’re going to do is we’re going to take one part of rubbing alcohol. You want to handle that, please? One part rubbing alcohol, not very large container, use the whole bottle of alcohol and two bottle of water. That’s simple. Okay, we’ve got one part of the alcohol. Now we’re going to put in two parts of water. Now this is a general all purpose stain remover. Stephanie Lydecker: For all kinds of clothes? Linda Cobb: All kinds of clothes. The only thing we want to stay away from is silk. Stephanie Lydecker: Okay. Linda Cobb: So if you want to pretest all of this and that’s throughout any stain remover that you’re using. Stephanie Lydecker: That’s all the ingredients you’re putting in this? Linda Cobb: That’s all the ingredients that we’re putting in here. Okay, screw that on and we’re going to get just a little shake of this. This will stay on your shaft for about a year. Stephanie Lydecker: Wow! Linda Cobb: So if you’ve mixed a lot of it, it doesn’t matter. And you’re just basically going to spray it on. See it a couple of minutes and then wonder as usual. And that’s all purpose stains. Stephanie Lydecker: Wow! Linda Cobb: Now moving along, our next one is going to be a beverage fruit and grass remover. For t his one we’re going to use equal parts of liquidish soap, any brand is fine, white vinegar and water. So we’re going to kind of just eyeball this. It doesn’t have to be perfect because as I always tell you it’s not brain surgery. Stephanie Lydecker: Grass is a tough one and those fruit juices as well, really a problem. Linda Cobb: Okay. Stephanie Lydecker: Just tell me when. Linda Cobb: Okay, keep going. That’s about right. Stephanie Lydecker: Great! Linda Cobb: And then, we’re going to put in our white vinegar. Stephanie Lydecker: This little blood also great too. This is in plastic bottles. Linda Cobb: They are their choice. If you have trouble finding this, even the ones that they put ketchup and mustard in for picnics, working and get those at the dollar store. Just make sure again that you label. Now we’re going to give it a shake. And then, we’re going to put it on to our grass stain, and we’re going to let that sip for a few minutes, and then we’re simply going to launder as usual. And again, this one will last on the shaft too, exactly the same amount of time at least a year with that problem. Stephanie Lydecker: A year, wow! Linda Cobb: Now one of the hardest stains to remove from clothes is oily stains. Things like salad dressing, olive oil, those kinds of things. So this is going to be our oily stain remover. This one we’re going to put glistering in. So what we want to do is I’ll have you hold that. Stephanie Lydecker: What is glistering exactly? Linda Cobb: Glistering is a lubricant. You’ll find this in a hand cream section at the drugstore. You can actually use it on your hands. It’s very lubricating, and it’s very thick. Stephanie Lydecker: And now it’s an ingredient

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