How to Relieve a Baby's Fever Chills Video

Find out how to relieve a baby's fever chills.
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How to Relieve a Baby's Fever Chills Dr Jim Sears: You mentioned your child’s shivering when she has a fever and what that tells me is that her body’s still trying to keep that high temperature, so it’s important to give a fever reducing medication. Ibuprofen, acetaminophen and one of the biggest mistakes parents make is maybe to use a lukewarm bath or even a cold bath without giving the medication and all that does is cause your child to shiver more and the temperature can actually go up. Something else you can do is cool liquids, clear fluids if your child’s older than about six months or so, you can use some nice clear liquids to keep them hydrated because when they have the fever, they’re going to lose a lot more fluid through while they’re breathing. Rebecca: And what about like a cool towel after the medication like around the head or something like that or wipe down? Dr. Jim Sears: That is actually a great thing to do, a cool towel on the back of the neck, something like that. What you don’t want to do -- and this kind of an old wives’ tale -- people still actually think you can do this out there is using rubbing alcohol. Some of the old books will talk about using rubbing alcohol because it does have a cooling effect on the skin but it’s actually dangerous. That alcohol can get absorbed into the skin where the vapors can actually get breathe into and actually, the alcohol it does cool the skin but it almost cools it too much, it constricts the blood vessels and then the temperature will go right back up, so you definitely do not want to do that. Rebecca: Okay. Thank you so much. Dr. Jim Sears: Yeah, all right, thanks Rebecca for calling. Dr. Travis Stork: Thank you Rebecca. Rebecca: Thank you. Bye-bye. Dr. Travis Stork: And just to clarify for every mother out there and father, a fever in and off itself is not a bad thing. It’s only when your child or you as an adult start experiencing severe symptoms from it. Well, you’re shivering so uncontrollably that it hurts or you’re vomiting, then you have to control the fever with those medicines you talked about, the acetaminophen and ibuprofen. Dr. Jim Sears: You want to maybe keep the baby comfortable, keep the room at a comfortable temperature and have loose clothing, so they’re able to sweat if they need to. Dr. Lisa Masterson: And they should always consult their pediatrician first before trying anything just to see what’s going because the pediatrician knows what’s going around. Dr. Jim Sears: Right, especially if the child’s younger. Dr. Lisa Masterson: Right. Dr. Jim Sears: The younger their age the more likely you should call the pediatrician. Dr. Drew Ordon: In general, don’t the shakes go along with a higher fever? Dr. Jim Sears: Yeah. It’s more of how the rapid change. If the fever’s going up very quickly, you tend to get those shakes. Dr. Travis Stork: Yeah. Dr. Jim Sears: Or even the seizure more likely to get a seizure if it’s rapidly rising. Dr. Drew Ordon: Not just the ultimate how high, how warm but how quickly it’s happening. Dr. Travis Stork: Exactly. Dr. Jim Sears: Now, you mentioned the fever itself isn’t scary. Fevers don’t cause brain damage. If it’s a severe infection, that’s what can cause -- Dr. Travis Stork: Unless, the temperatures gets up to 106, 107. Dr. Lisa Masterson: Really. Dr. Jim Sears: And that’s really, really rare.

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