How to Build a Compost Pile Video

In this eco-friendly video, you will learn how to build an environment-friendly compost pile.
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Compost is organic matter that is decomposed or broken down until it resembles loamy soil. Loam consists of the major soil particles, sand, silt and clay in relatively equal amounts. Thoroughly decomposed compost contains lots of humus, a soil improving material that your plants need. A well constructed compost pile heats up fast, decomposes uniformly and quickly, kills many diseases, insects and wheat seeds. It doesn’t smell and it’s easy to turn and maintain. Putting your compost in a container makes it look neater, helps keep it wet and prevents animals from getting into it. Here’s what you need to know to build a good compost pile. Choose a shady location out of the way. When it rains, there shouldn’t be puddles in the spot. Create a wire tube that’s three feet across or build a three sided box that’s three to four feet high in wide. Four sided stackable compost containers may also be purchased from your local gardening retail store. Add a six-inch layer of brown organic matter such as hay, stray, old leaves, wood ships and sodas to the bottom of the container. Add a three-inch layer of green organic matter such as green grass clippings, cow or horse manor, kitchen scraps such as egg shells, old bread, vegetable and fruit peels and coffee grounds or even high nitrogen fertilizer on top of the brown layer. Then, add a thin layer of dirt. Repeat these layers. Watering each one as you go until the pile is about three to four feet tall and fills the bin. A smaller pile won’t heat up well and a larger pile can be difficult to manage. Within two days, use pitch fork to mix the layers together well. Cover the pile with a waterproof tarp or lid that came with the store block container. Keep the following out of your compost bin. Kitchen scraps like meat, oil, fish, dairy products and bones, they attract animals to the pile. Keep out weeds that have gone to seed or that’s spread by their roots. Disease or insect infested plants, grass or weeds treated with herbicide, dog, cat, pig or human waste. If you build the pile carefully, it starts to cook or heat up within a week. Keep it cooking by watering it occasionally. Don’t let it get too soggy because the pile still needs air. Turn the pile with your pitch fork when it cools down by mixing the layers together well. You want to make sure the entire pile has a uniform temperature, not just the middle of the pile is hot. Let it cook again. How hot it gets and how long it cooks. It depends on the ratio of brown to green organic matter and the moisture level. When it’s cool, turn it again. You should have finish compost after two to three turnings. The finished product should be cool, crumbly, dark and smelling.

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