They're not old enough to order off a menu, but doctors say many babies need to cut their calorie intake.
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Kathy Magallanes: You're ready to eat baby. Casey Taylor: Kathy Magallanes is learning the ropes of motherhood for a second time. Kathy Magallanes: Is been a long time since I have been responsible for you know a little baby and I know things have changed. Casey Taylor: This grandmother is raising her granddaughter whenever Macy cries. Kathy Magallanes: All that is, baby is hungry and I'll give her a bottle. Dr. Russell Rothman: If you constantly feed babies when they are young, they actually loose their ability to sense fullness and then they may become more likely to be an over eater as they get older. Casey Taylor: More then half a million 4-year olds are obese. Weight in the first two years can be predictive of how much weight they will gain later. Dr. Russell Rothman: Most common vegetable for the toddlers is currently the French fries. Casey Taylor: Babies don't need juice, if you give it to them dilute it, for solids fewer crackers and cookies. You know when the baby is full she may keep her mouth closed, push away the bottle or start falling asleep. Dr. Russell Rothman: Try to recognize what is their hungry cry versus when they are really crying because they are wet or for some other reason. Casey Taylor: Babies can exercise its called tummy time. Dr. Russell Rothman: Learning to push themselves up, learning to crawl and really get more mobile even in a young age. Casey Taylor: Kathy wants to change her habits. Kathy Magallanes: You know my family we have a lot of diabetes these you know we going to watch that we don't want to feed her too much. Casey Taylor: Starting Macy off on the right foot. Kathy Magallanes: Try to walk a little bit. Casey Taylor: I'm Casey Taylor reporting.

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