This episode of Fresh Advice focuses on bacterial and parasite based STDs, which are the types that can be cured with treatment.
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Hi! Welcome to Cherry TVs fresh advice. My name is Amy Levine. Today, I will be talking about curable STDs. Sex should be pleasurable, fun and worry-free. However, you never know who is what. So you need to be armed with information to make smart choices and reduce or eliminate your risk of contracting an STD. First, let us discuss terms. You probably heard the term STD that stands for sexually transmitted diseases. You may have also heard the term STI that stands for sexually transmitted infections. What is the difference? Well, there is no difference it is just semantics text. I use STDs but you can take your pick up terms. The reality is, it is still includes the same types. When dealing with the curable STD, the sooner it is detected, diagnosed and treated, the better. Curable STDs are bacterial and parasitic in nature and can get much worse over time. The one we will talk about today are Chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis. All are bacteria and I will give you the basics. Let us start with Chlamydia. Chlamydia is usually transmitted during vaginal sex through infected vaginal or seminal fluids. Often, when infected with chlamydia there are no symptoms. If there are symptoms, they will show up anywhere from one to three weeks after exposure. In women, these symptoms include a change in vaginal discharge or burning sensation when urinating. If not caught early enough, women may experience lower abdominal or lower back pain, nausea, fever, pain during sex, or bleeding at times between periods. These later symptoms indicate that the infection has spread to the upper genital tract causing pelvic inflammatory disease or PID. That can unfortunately cause infertility. If guys are infected and shows symptoms, they may experience discharge from the urethra, the hole in their penis, a burning sensation when they pee or burning or itching around the urethra. For both men and women, Chlamydia can also infect the rectum from anal sacs or the mouth from oral sex. Next is gonorrhea. Like Chlamydia, gonorrhea is transmitted during vaginal sex through infected seminal or vaginal fluids. In addition, people infected, often do not have symptoms. However if symptoms appear, they are often mistake it for another type of infection and not an STD. Symptoms for gonorrhea if they occur, generally show up for women 10 days after exposure. They include an increase in vaginal discharge a burning feeling or pain when urinating or bleeding between periods. Also, like Chlamydia, if gonorrhea is not caught early on, it can spread to the upper genital tract causing PID which can damage reproductive organs, caused chronic pelvic pain, and in some cases, lead to infertility. For men when gonorrhea symptoms manifest, they appear a lot sooner than women about two to five days. Symptoms can include a burning feeling when urinating, discharge from the urethra that can be white, yellow or green in color, swelling or painful testicles. In men and women, gonorrhea can also be spread during oral sex and anal sex infecting the throat and rectum respectively. Last, we have sephylis. This STD is transmitted to direct contact with the sore during vaginal, anal, and oral sex with an infected partner. Sores mainly appear on the vulva inside the vagina, on the penis, around the anus, or in the rectum. Sores can also occur on the lips and in the mouth. People with syphilis often do not detect symptoms for years but the longer it goes undetected, the higher the risk for complications. A shanker or lesion can occur as one or many sores. They are usually small, rounds and painless so they are often mistaken for something else. On average, the time of infection to the first sore on or around the genitals is 21 days after exposure. If left untreated, it progresses to the secondary stage. A rashes looks like rough red or reddish brown spots on the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet. This can happen weeks after the shanker disappears. In addition, rashes with the differe

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