Dr. Barry Hainer discusses the immunizations that are recommended for children and also breaks down the vaccination schedule according to years.
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What immunizations are recommended for children? Dr. Barry Hainer: Well there are about it dozen immunizations that are given in the first year and half of life. It doesn’t different immunization, some of them are single dose, some require as many as four or five doses over the course of that timeframe so the immunization schedule is crowded in the first 18 months of life because there are now a number of effective vaccinations that treat many childhood diseases that were common in the last 50 or 100 years that we rarely see anymore because of effective vaccination. When we move into the pre-teen group there are currently three and starting in this coming year of fourth immunization group that is recommended and all told in the first 18 months of life a combination of oral and injectable vaccine are provided that may total of 18 or 19 separate dose. What immunizations should children receive in their first year of life/ Dr. Barry Hainer: The immunizations that are given in the first year of life include Hepatitis B which is began usually the initial dose immediately in the birth, the first 24 or 48 hours of life. Diphtheria Tetanus and Pertussis or whooping cough are given at the first two month, Roda virus is given along with Polio also in the first two months of life, Influenza B bacterial infection is given also at the first two months of life and pneumococcal vaccine to protect against infection with pneumococcal organisms also starts at the first two months of life. There are some booster doses that continue throughout that first year of life and after twelve months of age then mumps, measles, rubella or German measles and Varicella or chicken pox is added to the group of immunizations along with Hepatitis A a second Hepatitis virus. Booster doses for diphtheria, Tetanus, whooping cough, polio and mumps, measles, rubella and a Varicella or chicken pox are repeated at ages four to six years of age. At ages 10 to 12 the pre-adolescent group of immunizations are currently recommended would be a booster dose of Tetanus, Diphtheria and Pertussis or whooping cough, influenza will be added to the recommendation this year for all adolescence. Meningococcal vaccine to protect against meningococcal infections that can— one of the most common cause of meningitis in children and adolescence ages 2 to 18 and currently for female adolescence the Human Populo Virus vaccine is began between ages 9 and 12.

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