Learn about the various types of baby swings available to you on the market today so your baby can swing around with a smile.
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When it comes to buying your baby a swing, it’s important to know what she is getting into. Here is some advice from consumer reports. If you can, try your baby in a friend or relative’s swing first to see if he or she likes it or take your baby to the store with you for test runs. Take along your own C and D batteries and try the floor models. Your babies reactions may help you decide on the brand or whether he is even a candidate for a swing in the first place. Decide between a traditional swing or a portable one. If you want the option of moving your swing from room to room often and taking it on road trips or if you’re short on living space, a travel swing maybe right for you. If you chose a traditional swing, decide between side to side movement or front to back motion, some swings like Nature’s Touch Baby Papasan, Cradle Swing by Fishers Price move in both directions. Consider comfort. Seating ranges from deep-padded womb-like cradles to a wider chair with an adjustable infant head support. For the infancy stage, you want a seat reclines or has an angle back because your baby won’t be able to hold his head up. Check the stores return policy. Try the swing within the time limits of the stores return policy, usually within 30 days. So you have the option of taking it back, keep the receipt and the packaging. A noisy motor maybe a deal breaker for you, buy new. Infant’s swing safety standards are continually being updated. To make sure that your baby is using the safest possible swing, buy new and not used. Older swings may not have an adequate restraint system which can put your baby at risk of falling. So don’t be tempted to use an old outdated swing. Hand-made downs are great for clothes, but not for baby swings. Good luck with your purchase and I hope she enjoys the ride.

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