This health video looks at how a new treatment is allowing us to grow new blood cells to help combat certain diseases.
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Jennifer Mathews: What's hard work for most of us is the good life Tom Reynolds. Tom Reynolds: It's peaceful. It's serene. Jennifer Mathews: But life on the farm became difficult last year. Tom Reynolds: I would have a shooting pain that would hit me right in my buttocks. Jennifer Mathews: Tom had peripheral vascular disease, where the arteries supplying blood to his legs became blocked. Left untreated, gangrene can occur. Dr. Arshed Quyyumi: It can be pretty devastating. The options are very limited often. This is how amputations occur. Jennifer Mathews: Doctors told Tom there was nothing they could do for him, and he had visions of life in a wheelchair. Tom Reynolds: Probably the most depressing thing you can ever experience. Jennifer Mathews: But then Tom found out about Dr. Arshed Quyyumi's study on a new option; a growth factor called GM-CSF. When injected into patients, it stimulates bone marrow to release stem cells, helping the body form new blood vessels. Dr. Arshed Quyyumi: The implications, I think are very exciting because one way we think that cardiovascular disease progression can be impeded and even reversed is by improving your blood vessel function. Jennifer Mathews: That means fewer heart attacks, strokes, and amputations. Tom Reynolds: It is just like an additional life, really. Jennifer Mathews: Tom is enjoying his time on the farm with his son, Tim, and has replaced his visions of wheelchairs with a new scene. This is Jennifer Mathews reporting.

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