In this medical video learn how the same GPS technology used to guide your car can now help make it easier for doctors to repair your heart.
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Jennifer Matthews: Ryan Moore was playing baseball when he first felt his heart racing. Ryan Moore: It felt like it was gonna' jump out of my chest. Jennifer Matthews: Ryan had Wolf-Parkinson-White syndrome, a condition that made his heart beat at dangerously high levels. He needed a procedure called cardiac ablation to destroy the tiny fibers that cause the arrhythmia. Doctors place catheters in the heart to locate the abnormal tissue and deliver a shock. But Ryan's abnormality was deep within his heart, so doctors couldn't get to it with the standard approach. Dr. Warren Jackman used technology similar to a GPS device to map Ryan's heart and see exactly where the catheters needed to go. Dr. Warren Jackman: In a sense it's locating the position in space similar to how GPS works. Instead of taking the signals from a satellite, it took the signals from under the table. Jennifer Matthews: A robot guided the catheter on its own and corrected the exact problem spot that appeared on the map. The result for Ryan's family was nothing short of a miracle. Dr. Jackman says the new technique could be used to correct just about any type of arrhythmia in the future -- making the procedures more precise and safer. Dr. Warren Jackman: It should allow all physicians to get access to all of the areas. Jennifer Matthews: Two weeks after his procedure, Ryan is back to playing ball -- racking up stats on the field and making history with a promising technology. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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