Pediatrician Dr. Jim Sears explains why some germs can actually be your friends.
Read the full transcript »

Good Germs vs. Bad Germs in Children Dr. Jim Sears: Let me show you why germs can be your friends. Right here, we’ve got germ boy here and we’ve got the -- the good germs are in green and the bad germs are in red and usually they live in balance, in harmony with each other. But if you tend to kill them all up, sometimes all the bad germs can take over without the good germs keeping them at that. Liz Vaccariello: I’ve read a recent study that suggested that instinctively that’s why babies put things in their mouth that it’s not just a way to explore the environment but it’s a way that we us physiological are prone to exposing the human body the germs. Dr. Travis Stork: Kids are supposed to get dirty. They’re supposed to lick things and try them. Again, cold months, winter months, you don’t want them going around and licking the bus handrail that’s different. Liz Vaccariello: Can I add one thing? No, I would say that they’ve got to play outside but be careful of pesticides, chemicals. Part of the -- you know I let my kids play in a field but on the front lawn after the lawn guy has been there, no. Dr. Lisa Masterson: That’s it. Dr. Drew Ordon: I could see you can overly clean too. Liz Vacariello: Yeah. Dr. Travis Stork: But I think the point that we all would agree with is the over worried mother who cleans every surface at home, every five minutes, that’s too much. Dr. Jim Sears: You’re right. Because you’re exposing the chemicals and you’re avoiding some of the good germs.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement