This medical video focuses on how gene therapy could help those who have foot wounds.
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Jeniffer Mathews: Mark Brownell can't wait to go fishing in his restored bass boat. He did all the work himself, right down to the non-skid tape. Jeniffer Mathews: Mark is glad to be focused on fishing, rather than the wounds on his feet. Ulcers from years of diabetes led to the amputation of each of his toes. Gerit Mulder: And, so they don't do anything about it, until it's often too late. Mark Brownell: They told me the next time I come in for any kind of surgery, they'll have to take it off halfway to the knee. Jeniffer Mathews: But Mark's leg may have been saved with this experimental gene therapy. He used the gel for about two months after more than two years of open sores. Gerit Mulder: We're beginning to look at products that actually affect, or interact with, cells in our body. Jeniffer Mathews: The gel contains an inactive cold virus. Gerit Mulder: And that virus helps deliver the specific gene sequence into the cells themselves. Jeniffer Mathews: Doctor Mulder calls it "genetic machinery." Mark doesn't need the gel anymore, just cleaning and re-bandaging at his check-ups. Mark Brownell: It's done a fine job closing things up. Like I said, put some on the front of my foot, see if I can grow a few toes back, but that would be a miracle. Jeniffer Mathews: Mark's sense of humor has kept his spirits up while also keeping him looking forward to his fishing trips. Jeniffer Mathews: This is Jeniffer Mathews reporting.

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