Gastric Balloon Programs Video

The Gastric Balloon can help you take control of your weight without the risk of surgery or drugs. Used in harmony with a medically supervised nutrition plan and behaviour modification program, it can help you achieve and maintain the health and a...
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Hello. I’m Dr. Chris Cobourn, Surgeon and Medical Director of the Surgical weight loss center from Toronto, Canada. The Allergan Intragastric Balloon is a non-surgical, non-pharmaceutical device used along with lifestyle changes to achieve and sustained weight loss in patients who have not been suCCessful using traditional methods. The balloon procedure is an important part of how we at the surgical weight loss center help overweight or obese patients, those with a BMI greater than 28 to achieve sustained weight loss. The balloon helps the patient feel full with smaller meals. Once inserted, the stomach cannot hold as much food and gastric emptying is delayed, this helps provide a feeling of satiety without compromising digestion or the absorption of nutrients. The balloon can stay in the stomach for up to six months. During this time, patients can expect to see noticeable weight loss while at the same time establish healthy dietary and lifestyle changes necessary to keep the weight off. Weight loss with the balloon can help resolve the common beliefs associated with being either overweight or obese without the need for surgery or medication. In this video, we will see the insertion and the removal of the Allergan Intragastric Balloon as well as the setup of the equipment to be used. With the appearance of the newly designed intragastric balloon, the use of this tool in the treatment of obesity may again be with us. The new generation of balloon, the Allergan Intragastric Balloon System is the result of research in the course of the past few years by Allergan Health and is based on recommendations in this field. The device consists of a silicone balloon connected to a guiding catheter utilized during placement. The balloon is initially packaged inside the silicone sheath. The balloon is filled with saline via the fill tube expanding until it is released from the sheath. An ampule of methylene glue is added to the saline during the preparation of the device. A 50 or 60 CC Luer Lock Syringe is used for the filling of the balloon. Methylene glue is added to the saline to allow for immediate detection of leaks due to excretion of methylene glue in the urine. In a rare case of leakage, it will be necessary to remove the balloon. The tubing must be primed with saline prior to connecting it to the balloon fill tube. The fill tube has a one-way valve system which allows the syringe to be filled from the saline bag and then pumped into the balloon without additional handling. The placement of the balloon is achieved under endoscopic control, ideally with the patient under conscious sedation. A preliminary gastroscopy is carried out in order to visualize in the esophageal, gastric, or duodenal lesions which my contraindicate the placement of the balloon either temporarily or indefinitely. The examination of the cardia including a retroflexed view of the stomach is critical to a large hiatus hernia or Grade 3 or Grade 4 esophagitis, which would contraindicate placement of the balloon. Grade 1 or Grade2 esophagitis should be treated with PPI therapy and providing there’s not a large hiatus hernia, the patient will be left with PPI therapy while the balloon is in place. It is also important to ensure there is no duodenal or gastric ulceration, which would then require one to two months of curative medical prior to the balloon placement. Once a thorough endoscopy is completed and provided there is no contraindication, the gastroscope is removed so that the balloon can be introduced into the stomach via the esophagus. The balloon and fill tube are well lubricated in order to facilitate passage. The most common area of resistance is at the level of the cricopharyngeus muscle. The introduction of the balloon involves gently advancing the balloon to the back of the throat and then down through the superior sphincter of the esophagus. If there is no resistance, we advance the balloon into the stomach stopping at the 50 cm mark of the fill tube

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