Sasha Wainstein MD FACS Urology
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Male2: And the HPV—the poliomavirus. Male1: Is a big subject today. Male2: That is a big subject and it is very common and it does not cause anything and the they come back and you treat them very easily and they go away, however the disease is there because there is no cure for any one of the virus. Male1: Well, without giving a vaccine, it seems to be 70% effective. It cannot be full— Male2: It is very important before they catch it. Male1: But there is some concern about the vaccine. There is something—the kids are getting lightheaded, they are fainting. There is some concern about some deaths. We would be checking it very carefully and it seems to be safe and we recommending it, but like any fads in new vaccine, you have to be concerned that something is going to pop up down the road. Male2: Yes, we do not know down the road what is going to happen— Male1: We now have proof of 25 years experience that if we give to all these women— Male2: It is brand new. Male1: It is brand new. It appears it is going to work but that is something we are going to learn about, I hope that our lifetime, we all live to get our prostate cancer. Male2: Let me ask you something. If you see a lot of these young girls and they do not have anything coming, would you recommend the vaccine? Male1: We are recommending it, but we will give them a great discussion. The discussion is, we think it is safe. We heard about some deaths around the world and we are going to watch them respond on this—I think 11, two of them died we know from a stroke-like reaction, but they also had myocarditis. One of them was a 12-year-old girl that died. That bothered me. They had no explanation. Male2: That is a very young age. Male1: I know and it bothers me. In fact, we are checking all the deaths and actually, it is a good thing, I called the FDA. The guy was really nice to me. I spoke to some disease control. I can get to call back. We could go to the website. I called two pediatric neurologists. Sometimes, you get a vaccine and it is like an immune response—vascular and it can cause a stroke. There was some concern of chicken pox disease and maybe the vaccine could beat it. So there is a little bit of a flag. So what I have done, and I want it mandated. As a pediatrician, I tell the parents, we think it is safe. There are some concerns, I think 4 million doses have been sold. There are 11 cases. One I cannot explain the way easily. The other, I think, there are other things going on, but it is a new vaccine. There are 3700 cases of pseudo cancer diagnosis in this cancer and 300,000 cases in the world. We may wipe out half those deaths from these cancers and this country could be a couple of thousand, three or four thousand a year against ten or 15 deaths, and I do not know—who do you sue if the governor mandates a vaccine and I have to give it to all of these kids and something happens to the kid, who is at fault. So we really think it should be mandated. I think that you have had teenage girls, it should be I discussing with you the right way, which is—here is what we know. it is a new vaccine. We think it is going to do its stuff. There are some concerns. I would tell you what I know. I will keep you updated along the way. It is not a cheap vaccine. The disease is horrible. We have a nice discussion. It is your decision, as long as we present the vaccine correctly. If you say no to me, after I give you all of those facts, I respect your decision. You say yes, and we go through it, nothing else to keep and if something happens, which we do not know about, at least I made a good faith effort and as you know, we know each other by 30 years, I like you. Worry about our patients. I worry that I got up that day and I have a clear thinking in mind and made the right decisions, but I do not want it mandated and that is something that they have to know. If I had to look at a mother in the eye, we gave you something that ma

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