In this medical video learn how up until now, polygraphs have been the gold standard for detectives when questioning potential criminals. Now, groundbreaking research may provide an innovative way to expose lies deep within the brain.
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Jennifer Matthews: Polygraphs work by measuring changes in the body like blood pressure and sweating. While they're up to 90-percent accurate, truth-tellers can still fail, and good liars can pass them. Physical responses occur when lies are formed in the brain. Using a functional MRI, radiologist Scott Faro and his team looked at what areas of the brain were active during deception. Dr. Scott Faro: If we're actually looking at the primary source, that's going to be a much harder area to hide within an individual. Jennifer Matthews: Dr. Faro had 11 people take part in a mock crime. Some were asked to lie about it, while others told the truth. Dr. Scott Faro: This represents areas in the brain, and these red dots are specific areas that demonstrate activation when one was lying. We also had areas of activation with certain individuals within the hippocampus, which is the area of emotional response. Twice the number of areas in the brain were active in the people who were lying than in those who were telling the truth. Dr. Faro says much more research is needed, but the MRI lie detector test has far-reaching potential. Dr. Scott Faro: I think eventually it will develop into the judicial system where we can see some high-level crimes potentially be sought-after for this technique. Jennifer Matthews: And, Dr. Faro says because this monitors brain activity, it's highly unlikely that dishonest people could pass it. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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