This medical video focusws on ways and treatments to fix macular degeneration.
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Jennifer Matthews: Evelyn LeClaire was diagnosed with wet macular degeneration two years ago. Evelyn LeClaire: There was hemorrhaging in the back of the eye. I had no idea what it was. The first thing I said was, "Am I going blind?" Jennifer Matthews: Dr. John Olson says the type she has, occult macular degeneration, results in the most vision loss. Dr. John Olson: In the occult form, the leaking vessels are more hidden and buried deeper in the tissue and so it makes it more difficult to use treatment for. Jennifer Matthews: Now, a new treatment called transpupillary thermotherapy may help. It heats up leaky blood vessels. Dr. John Olson: Instead of cauterizing or burning the tissue, we are just gently heating the tissue a few degrees. And that, over time, facilitates a closure or a sealing of those leaking blood vessels. Jennifer Matthews: Studies show 25% of patients actually improved. 50% had their disease stabilized. Dr. John Olson: To the extent that we can preserve their vision and allow them to do the things that they've planned to do in their retirement is very, very gratifying. Jennifer Matthews: Evelyn received the treatment and her vision improved. Evelyn LeClaire: If they wouldn't have taken care of it and done that, I probably would be blind. Jennifer Matthews: Instead, she's able to long stitch and tend to her four cats. Garfield lost his eye just a few months ago. Evelyn LeClaire: We've both got eye problems. I couldn't live here by myself without them. It's not an empty house. Jennifer Matthews: With her cats by her side, Evelyn has plenty to keep her eyes on. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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