This medical video focuses on a new treatment called Needle Aponeurotomy which is being used to great success to help those with Dupuytren's contracture.
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Mike Smith: It started physically interfering with things that I did and I also knew that it would get worse. Jennifer Mathews: Today Mike Smith can use his hands even though he has dupuytren's contracture, a condition that if untreated prevents his fingers from straightening. Mike Smith: If I would go to the opera or the symphony I couldn't clap. Jennifer Mathews: Dupuytren's causes the fibrous tissue in the palm of the hands to thicken and tighten forcing fingers to contract. Mike Smith: Got to the point where my finger was probably like that. Jennifer Mathews: Doctors recommended surgery, but it can take a long time to recover. Male Speaker: You actually start to cut here, and you zigzag down and fly open the finger, core it out and restitch the skin. Jennifer Mathews: Instead of surgery Mike opted for an alternative treatment called Needle Aponeurotomy or NA. Male Speaker: So let me know if you are feeling any of this. Jennifer Mathews: Instead of a scalpel Dr. Keith Denkler inserts hypodermic needles to cut the contracted tissue and straighten the patient's fingers. The hand is knobbed with a local anesthetic. Dr. Keith Denkler: The advantage of this procedure over traditional surgery is a very rapid recovery. Jennifer Mathews: Surgery takes months to recover and often require skin grabs and physical therapy. With the NA technique the hand is bandaged for just a couple of days. Patients can perform stretches without a therapist. Mike Smith: I am very satisfied with the outcome. Jennifer Mathews: Its no wonder Mike's finger went from this to this and another patient's finger severely contracted before the procedure now look like this. This is Jennifer Mathews reporting.

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