First Week Home with Your Baby Video

How do women experience the first week at home after giving birth? Georgia Witkin talks to three women about their experience.
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Dr. Georgia Witkin: Hi I'm Dr. Georgia Witkin. Kimberly Pauley: And I'm Kimberly Pauley. Dr. Georgia Witkin: And I'm Kimberly's mother. Kimberly Pauley: And I'm the mother of 2 boys. Dr. Georgia Witkin: Which makes me GG for Grandma Georgia. Kimberly Pauley: So, welcome to GG and me. Dr. Georgia Witkin: We talked about everything. Kimberly Pauley: Well, the reason I talk to my mother about everything is that she is a proffer of psychiatry, professor of OB-GYN, she has written 10 books on stress, and she is a Fox News contributor. Dr. Georgia Witkin: And Kimberly is a lawyer, a columnist, a college professor, and pregnant. Kimberly Pauley: So, we're gonna be talking about pregnancy. Please join us. Dr. Georgia Witkin: So, were talking about getting home from the hospital, were talking about that first week. First say hello. Kimberly Pauley: Hi my name is Kimberly Pauley and I'm pregnant with my 3rd son. Susan Crouse: My name is Susan Crouse and I gave birth to my 2nd son 2 weeks ago. Jenny Vynerib: And I'm Jenny Vynerib and this is Oliver. He is 3-1/2 weeks old. Dr. Georgia Witkin: So, here's the question, the very first time you were pregnant, you were in the hospital getting ready for the first week at home, in your mind what were you preparing for? What did you think that would be like? Kimberly Pauley: I thought that would be very exciting. I thought I would be busy all the time. I thought I would just be in this blissful state with my baby and it turned out that I was completely overwhelmed. I was completely exhausted. I was completely hormonal. Dr. Georgia Witkin: Yeah the prolactin drops. Kimberly Pauley: Completely hormonal. I cried at everything. Jenny Vynerib: Yeah. Dr. Georgia Witkin: I think it's important that women know that prolactin, all the hormones changed. It doesn't mean you have postpartum unless it goes on and on, but it does mean the moodiness will be there and its natural, plus you are exhausted. Jenny Vynerib: Yeah that takes a big toll, it's the sleep depravation. I think that the first night in the hospital was bliss. You know meeting your child and it's just wonderful. I fell in love with her that night and then you get home, and it all hits. Dr. Georgia Witkin: What hits? Jenny Vynerib: And the---- Being overwhelmed by the smallest things. Everything feels so big. It's the lack of sleep; I think that really hits you and it's the hormones. I mean, I like to attribute it to the hormones, but we have to look at the big picture that hopefully a few weeks down the road, it starts to become normal. I mean nothing is normal, everything changes. Dr. Georgia Witkin: So there is hope? Jenny Vynerib: There is hope, but you have to adjust to it. Dr. Georgia Witkin: How about all the visitors? Susan Crouse: I mean---- I actually had sort of being forewarned by a lot of friends of mind. Thankfully, I was having kids a little bit later than some of my friends; so, I think that for me, I had been given a pretty accurate, you know barebones description of what it's gonna be like. So, I unlike you didn't have this expectation that it was gonna be sort of this blissful, happy first week. You know-- Jenny Vynerib: I think I am. Susan Crouse: I think I felt down a little bit; so, I think that I was sort of aware that there was gonna be this very light changeable emotion and moments to moment, it was gonna be different and I was really conscious of limiting people visited me in the hospital, which-- Kimberly Pauley: That's what I was just gonna say, I think the most important thing is that when---- the first week, if it's your first baby, that you say to your friends come to the hospital. Susan Crouse: Uh huh. Kimberly Pauley: Because then you can show them the baby, they're completely safe. You don't even have to have the baby in the room; they can be with all the other babies behind the glass. Susan Crouse: Right. Kimberly Pauley: You don't have to breathing on your new born-- Susan Crouse: And people don't stay for ho

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