In this medical video learn how a new test may help cancer patients get the right treatment.
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Jennifer Matthews: Al Clever is working hard to get his energy back so he can do what he loves best, going to Steelers games. He's been a fan for a long time. Al Clever: I've been one since I was old enough to know what football was. Jennifer Matthews: But Clever will have to watch this season from home. A few months ago he lost part of his lung to cancer. Al Clever: When they told me I had a spot there, it really floored me. Jennifer Matthews: Anil Potti along with doctors at Duke University Medical Center figured out the best way to treat Al's cancer. They developed the first-ever genomic test to predict which patients will need chemotherapy to survive and which chemo will work best. Anil Potti: Each individual has a unique set of genes. Jennifer Matthews: The tumor is removed and scanned, the Lung Metagene Predictor can read the genomic fingerprint. Each column is a different patient with lung cancer; each colored box is a specific gene. Doctors compare the genes and decide which therapy will work. Anil Potti: I'm not just a doctor who treats lung cancer I'm here to treat your lung cancer. Jennifer Matthews: Dr. Potti believes this test could increase the odds for all cancer patients. Anil Potti:: This gives tremendous hope for those patients. Jennifer Matthews: A genomic test showed Al did indeed need chemo. Al Clever: The last two scans they've done on me has shown negative. Jennifer Matthews: Making him one step closer to his real goal, getting back to watching his Steelers play. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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