Female Fertility Facts Video

As a woman ages, her chance of conceiving a child declines. OB/GYN Dr. Lisa Masterson discusses a test to determine ovarian health and offers ways to ensure fertility for as long as possible.
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Female Fertility Facts Dr. Travis Stork: Welcome back today, we’re covering all those dreaded health issues every woman fears and right now we have a question from Marta in the audience. So Marta, what's going on? Marta: Hi doctors, I'm 219 and I've been married for two years and recently I came across an article that said that you lose 90% of your eggs by them time you're thirty. Well, I'm 29 so naturally I freaked out and I'm wondering – yeah, should I run home to my husband and get on that or should I not worry about that? I don’t know what to do. Dr. Lisa Masterson: No, don’t listen to the pediatrician. But this is so common and so women come in to my office with exactly the same question that you have. And basically, every woman is worrying about her biological clock, if it's ticking and how long it's going to tick. And that study has some flaws in it, but we do want women to know that you're still on the biological even through you're pursuing careers, and travelling and doing all that. Basically, you're born with a certain number of eggs in a million and then by puberty it goes down to 300,000, so it's decreasing, we've got a finite, unlike these guys are turning them out all the time, as we speak. We have a finite amount of eggs, it's okay go with it. It's just happens, which is frustrating. And so really those numbers – what you have to think about is what's your chance of having a live birth. And age 28 or your late 20s, it's really about 50% to 40%. Now, the thing you know is that’s probably not as much as you thought, even though it's not with that number is saying to you in that study, it still starts to get lower as you start to reach the 30s. But the late 30s, then it's about 30% and by 43, it's going to be about 10% chance of having a live birth. The problem is that you ovulate every once a month. And it's really about the eggs and ovulation. So what happens is in the ovaries, every month you get a follicle or a cyst, and within that cyst that egg develops. And all if this is controlled by hormones in your brain, and one of those hormones is called follicle stimulating hormone. And that causes the follicle to mature and then it actually, once it's matured, it will burst out of the ovary and it's beautiful animation, and the fallopian tubes have these fimbriae on it, these little soft like things that kind of grab the egg and it goes into the tube. These fimbriae, this sort of like frond like things on the end of the fallopian tube and it sort of brings it up to the tube so it can be fertilized. So this is quite a beautiful process, so there's a lot of things that can affect your ovulation, and that’s why the percentage rates are so much lower than women think. So we don’t want scare women, especially a young woman like you, but as you start to get into your 30s, and towards the 40s. yes your clock is ticking because your chances are much lower of having a live pregnancy. So with the follicle stimulating hormone, there are things you can do over the counter, that’s the H Test, one by first response is great, which can kind of tell you if it's high that you may not be ovulating, or that you may be going into early menopause, this is a great time to talk to your doctors for fertility workups. And so healthy lifestyles help in the egg quality if you live a healthy lifestyle, so as you get your mid-30s, late 40s, you need to think about this. Dr. Travis Stork: Thank you so for sharing that question, very important question. Marta: Thank you.

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