Fathers Talking About Fatherhood Video

Tips, advice and invaluable knowledge for new parents, also for new fathers.
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Emma Howard: Welcome back to Baby Talk on the Baby Channel. I am Emma Howard and today, we're talking about fatherhood. Joining me now is Jim Parton, who represents the charity Families Need Fathers. Still with us is parenting expert Tim Mungeam. I must say that you also got Josephine with you. You are Jim Parton's little girl. She is clearly needing her father, very happy to be here. Give her your mobile. Let's see how long that's interesting for. Jim Parton: She gave her my mobile. She took it. Emma Howard: She is also trying to present. Oh, she is showing great signs of - I think she is coughing. Jim Parton: She is very tired and this is an occasion and that she's going to be a big part of it I think. Emma Howard: And your talking is absolutely brilliant. Now tell me about Families Need Fathers, because I would have thought that, initially people say, oh, you're not that controversial -- superman out there. Jim Parton: We suffered a little bit of an image problem perhaps because of that. Emma Howard: Yeah. Jim Parton: But then we divorced as I want to see our children. Emma Howard: You must say, you're not divorced form Josephine's mother, you're divorced from your other - you got a 19 year-old son. Jim Parton: I've got a 19 year-old son who -- and I don't see anything like this often as I'd like, yes. Emma Howard: Is it very different being a dad second time around for you? Jim Parton: It is. Well, it is and it isn't. I mean there are things which just don't worry me, perhaps the way they did the -- I was a lot younger. I think anything worried me the first time. I think quite often older parents, they get faced by little mishaps that children get themselves into, whereas now I am not too bothered about what she does. She starts crying -- Emma Howard: You mean younger parents get faced? Jim Parton: Yes. Emma Howard: Yes. I think -- Jim Parton: No, I mean older parents get faced. Emma Howard: Alright. Jim Parton: Older first time parents. Emma Howard: Older first time parents, right, I am with you. Jim Parton: Yes. There is a difference because there is a quite tougher way, maybe a little bit overprotective. Emma Howard: I think actually just first time parents. Jim Parton: Maybe. Emma Howard: I think it's new for everybody but anyway your experience about it, I mean -- Jim Parton: Well, I am seeing as young people today, they discover the boldness of youth. Emma Howard: Okay. Jim Parton: And nothing faces them at all. Emma Howard: We're certainly seeing that here, the boldness of youth. Shall we find that mobile on the floor. Jim Parton: Yeah switch on the -- Emma Howard: He is gone under the sofa. Jim Parton: You got it? Tim Mungeam: Yeah, got it. Emma Howard: Yeah, we get to there, we go Josephine -- so your group, how is it different? Jim Parton: We're a self out group. People who join our Internet forums and they seek advice, sort of paralegal advice. They have to maintain a relationship and they hand out to wind up your ex and sort of thing. All the mine field you trade when I think break up. Emma Howard: Yeah, so there is a program on at the moment, I think perhaps a divorce spouse growing up your children. Jim Parton: Yes. It seems -- Emma Howard: I haven't seen it either. Jim Parton: One of them, I think he is brilliant. People have said, we've seen a lot and it's really a good program. It's a way to go. It's - the parents got to learn to cooperate because the child is base. Emma Howard: And putting her first, yeah, putting her -- Jim Parton: Which is very hard for parents to do on their own with the other one and leave that mike. Emma Howard: Now she is going for the one thing we got to let her touch. Jim Parton: Yeah. Emma Howard: You are a clever -- well, we will try and distract her from your mike. Let me ask Tim about groups like this, I mean it's very, very valuable running there across that legal line, which of course we have seen lately. Tim Mungeam: Yeah, I mean fantastically important. I mean real

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