Gill Scott takes us through the ultrasound process.
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Eils Hewitt: Ultrasounds are an absolutely routine procedure during any pregnancy. But with technology moving on so quickly, the ultrasound is now capable of spotting a whole host of different potential problems with the pregnancy Gill Scott is a Midwife and Sonographer and has joined the Baby Channel to guide you through the ultrasound process. Lovely to see you. Thanks for coming in. Gill Scott: My pleasure! Eils Hewitt: Now, one of the first things that pregnant mums have, what are their first concerned, is whether the ultrasound process will harm the baby. Has that been only evidence to show that it's harmful? Gill Scott: No, ultrasounds in particular diagnostic ultrasounds has been around in the medical field for about 40 years and there hasn't been any evidence decide that there are any problems or any side effects cause to harm babies. There have been 1000s of studies and they are all ongoing, to say that there has been no side effects. Eils Hewitt: So how does it actually work? Gill Scott: How does ultrasound work? Eils Hewitt: Actually perhaps if you explain what ultrasound is, for people who haven't kind of gone through it, that will be helpful. Gill Scott: Okay. Ultrasound is one of the tools that we use in antenatal pregnancy, to find any problems with the baby. So we can go right from the start of pregnancy, looking at viability, making sure that the pregnancy is in the right place, and that there is an indeed one or more babies inside. We can go on through to looking at any anomalies that are detected and also to make sure that the baby is growing well and everything is progressing as it should be. Eils Hewitt: So it's not a scan, isn't it? I remember when I had seven-months-old little baby boy, I remember when I went along, I think it was about 12 weeks. Would that be right about 12 weeks? Gill Scott: Yeah. Different NHS hospitals will call people at different times. The majority of people will look, will receive a code around about 12 weeks to come in for dating scan. Eils Hewitt: Basically you have that kind of cold jelly, isn't it? They put it on your tummy and they rub this kind of cold gel around. Gill Scott: That's right. Eils Hewitt: Then you have got that, what is that -- Gill Scott: Probe. Eils Hewitt: The probe, well said, and they just kind of move this instrument around, across your tummy, don't they? Then the picture comes up on the TV screen. So there is just really mums watching, it doesn't hurt, because you don't feel anything, and it's kind of funny. But it's fascinating, when I went -- me and my husband went to have had our first scan, we looked at the monitor and we could just see, it was a very kind of grainy black and white shot. Gill Scott: That's right. Eils Hewitt: But our little baby boy was moving about and so a bit movement, then suddenly everything became real. We were got -- both quite tearful. Gill Scott: And people do get very emotional, and they don't realize how well formed babies are at 12 weeks. I think a lot of people just say that they think it's just like a little bean-shape, but in fact they are complete, they just need to grow 12 weeks, so yeah, they are very excited. Eils Hewitt: And now there is 2D scans and there is 4D ones, isn't it? So I have the basic, the 2D that you only get in NHS, tell us more about the four dimensional pictures you can get? Gill Scott: Okay, now basically just to say, there are -- we do 2D. We have to saw also 4D scanning in 2D, just to make sure that where the baby is lying and so there would be the 2D scan as well. But what happens is the 2D is like, looking at slice of breads in black and white, and then when we're going to the 4D, it's like looking at the whole loaf of breads. So it's slightly different and people are quite shock to have detailed. We can see these little people on the screen. Eils Hewitt: So the documentaries or babies in the room, they often use kind of four days, as you can see, babies from all different angles basicall

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