In this video, moms discuss their experiences and thoughts about postnatal Depression.
Read the full transcript »

Ingrid Tarrant: This postnatal depression is, I didn't suffer, I was so lucky, but I remember when I had my first child and again, things have changed over time. It's understood now and it wasn't then. There was a girl and it must be -- she had her baby born on the same day as I did and the next day, she was sitting in this room and I think this had to do with the – and everything and she was absolutely sobbing. Now, I understood baby blues and everything to just become like depression like this and like -- just cry and all sort of internal feelings and everything. She was really, really crying. Rachel Royce: I just gotten -- my baby was just three days old and it came with the milk, I was with tears and I remember the midwife who delivered the baby, coming to see how I was, was that I really happy that I can't stop crying, I'm sorry. But I knew I was fine and it was just like a real rush of hormones. Ingrid Tarrant: It’s just feel – it gets so bad. It is something that some people do. Rachel Royce: I think, that's a different thing. I think, the crying that comes with the milk is like a one-day thing, it's not at all the same as postnatal depression which is like a rush of hormones. I was lucky, I didn't suffer postnatal depression, but after that experience, I was frightened I would get postnatal depression, so I was so determined to have a lovely time. I took my friends around to see the baby and I didn't get postnatal depression at all. Ingrid Tarrant: But you might have came out because you had been exhausted with all your friends and it's like this, I'm depressed. So exactly, when you're tired, it brings you, oh my goodness. Rachel Royce: That's right. The difference between baby blues, that thing immediately afterwards, isn't that, when your body physically is in shock more or less, isn't it? Mara Lee: You're right and I think it's documented that's it's day three that you have that time and I have the same thing, I remember sitting in hospital and just overwhelmed with tears and with extreme sadness that was a bit confusing, because it was, I wanted this baby, she is here, that's great, but just something was controlling me inside and that relates to everything. But, I think, the postnatal depression thing, I mean, it's I really believe it exists and I wonder if it happens, because we put so much pressure on ourselves and going back to -- Ingrid Tarrant: Yeah, because what happened in Victorian and Edwardian days, did they have that sort of problem? Cheryl Baker: Oh yeah, it can't be any good thing. Ingrid Tarrant: Exactly, because their hormones are going to behave in exactly the same way. Rachel Royce: Didn't they give them the six weeks called “lying-in” in the olden days and they more or less treated the woman like a mad woman. I read this somewhere. Ingrid Tarrant: Oh my God! It is actually the worst. Rachel Royce: Yeah, it was called a “lying-in” period and it's for six weeks women sort of weren't allowed to go out and see anybody and to stay at home with the baby and be dead quiet, because we know you're going to be a bit worried. So, I think, that's been recognized. Mara Lee: I think, that's great. Ingrid Tarrant: Always going back, but the thing about sort of two weeks, my mother was in hospital for two weeks after her baby, you do need that time to adjust to that pressure. Otherwise you get no escape from the real world, it's like, one day you're motherless if you like, and suddenly the next day you've got a baby and yet the whole world hasn't changed around you. It's too much. Isn't that? Rachel Royce: You need to adjust to it. Mara Lee: I agree and I was one of these, I just pushed myself straight back after six months of being with the baby, but when I was with the baby, I'm just painting rooms and assembling furniture and working freelance. Ingrid Tarrant: But, the nice thing is doing the right thing, all part of the nice thing. Mara Lee: I think, I was a crazy woman, I need to feel like I'm achievi

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement