Facts About Adoption Video

In this video, learn some tips, advice and invaluable knowledge for new parents, such as adoption.
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Nina Sebastiane: In the UK today, there are 4,000 children waiting to be adopted. Many of them will never find a family because there are not enough people to adopt. Now I’m joined by Jonathan Pearce the director of adoption UK, and the Larry Baker he is 17, and was adopted when he was just 2 years old. Guys welcome to the show. Let me come to you first Jonathan. How difficult is it to adopt child in the UK? Jonathan Pearce: I’m not sure the difficult is the right way to approaching but it is a very involved in a complicated process and quite rightly said because adoption is predominately today about adopting children from the UK system or have to the history or experience of peace or neglect and so this though to be a rigorous system for assessing that they parents are right for the children that they there is nothing under alternate background and that there is a good match between parents and children. Nina Sebastiane: You say it from care as oppose to say 20; 30 years ago it wasn’t this way. Jonathan Pearce: Yes, that’s right. I mean over the course of the century but particularly from as suppose with 1960s, early 1970s onwards it changed from an adoption system that was focused on unmarried mothers, who have basically society didn’t approve of and they where either forced or persuaded to children for adoption. Now what happened in the past 30, 40 years is that’s become socially acceptable and this them all one parent families children are given for adoption purely because of being born out of wedlock and the focus is moved to adopting children form care system Nina Sebastiane: So, are there more children now then they where the in terms in the adoption -- I don’t really know the -- Jonathan Pearce: No, no I mean at it’s height probably around 1970 or so they are about 25,000 children a year being adopted and the movement it’s just started to increase but five years ago it’s about 2,000. Now it’s around about 4,000 in the UK. So, this about a long history to adoption in the way that it changes and it may risk either at this time was slightly behind what’s going on in society in social reflection society generally. Nina Sebastiane: Larry, you’re adopted at a very young age Larry Baker: Yeah. Nina Sebastiane: Weren’t you? Tell us your story. Larry Baker: And well, basically I was adopted around the age of 10. I well now adopted being -- Nina Sebastiane: Right. Larry Baker: And then basically I got adopted and be happy ever since. Nina Sebastiane: Do you anything about your birth parents or your background. Larry Baker: I know that my I think that what was I -- birth mother and I never know she looks like or what she would look like by then and I don’t know anything at all about my dad, and basically I know they detailed about my family. Nina Sebastiane: Well, you were actually 17 reading some of your CV I mean you’ve edited adoption UK magazine and adoption today I mean obviously you’re quite passionate about the subject, what is it that you want to get across to people who might be watching us. Larry Baker: Well, basically the fact that so many children out there and that no enough people come forward to actually even inquired about -- not knowing being less rigorous crisis as Jonathan said try he be a greater adult or even foster as they were Nina Sebastiane: Well, I now looking at my note here, and one of the things that’s absolutely stack at me some of the adoptions statics. Over 78,000 children in public care in the UK at the movement and after 4,000 across the UK waiting for adopt the parents, but for example it say in the year 2004, only 3,700 where actually found a home in the end you know. Jonathan Pearce: Yes, I mean that figure it is staggering one, there were around about 80,000 children in the care system. Nina Sebastiane: I’m just thinking of a stadium for kid – wasn’t awful amount of children. Jonathan Pearce: I’m however burdens -- how to deal with that. I mean most important to realize is that a lot of

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