Osteopathic physiatrist Dr. Steven Sampson explains how platelet-rich plasma therapy can treat osteoarthritis.
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Explaining Platelet-Rich Plasma Therapy Deborah Norville: When you had that procedure done, I couldn’t watch a lot of it because there are a lot of needles, did it hurt? Natasha: No. You feel a little poked but surgery hurts a lot more. Deborah Norville: Yeah. Dr. Travis Stork: This is a therapy that you’re working on right now. It’s not FDA approved. Steven Sampson: That’s correct. It’s important to know that this procedure is considered experimental. We’re conducting research and it’s very promising but people out there need to know that there’s a lot more work to be done with this but it’s very promising. Deborah Norville: In layman’s terms what exactly do you think is going on when you do this procedure? Steven Sampson: Well basically, we took Natasha’s platelet concentrated them and then there are ultrasound guidance like looking at the baby, we look and we see her meniscus, we inject the area within a millimeter of the site into her meniscus as well as into the cartilage which is an area that has eroded. And so it’s a two-fold process to reduce pain, address some of the areas of fluid that are irregular and potentially regenerate cartilage. Dr. Travis Stork: I’m trying to inspire our own bodies to heal our joints that have gone alright. Steven Sampson: Exactly and that’s the beauty of this procedure. It’s maximizing natural healing, taking the patient’s own blood. There’s very little risk of adverse effects in our pilot study. None of the patients have any side effects or suggested maybe safe and effective but more larger trials are needed. And this was the first trial that was ever submitted for publication for knee arthritis using the patient’s own blood platelets. Deborah Norville: Ideally, what would you like to be able to do physically, Natasha? Natasha: Well, I used to run so I would love to go back into running. Deborah Norville: Maybe not marathons? Natasha: Maybe not marathons but I can just run 30 minutes in the morning, I would be so happy. Dr. Travis Stork: Well, it’s exactly new treatment, new technology, good luck to you, Natasha, thank you so much for being here. Natasha: Thank you.

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