Etanercept Treatment for Alzheimer's Controversy Video

One doctor says he's found the answer to Alzheimer's disease: a controversial injection. Other experts say there's no such thing as a miracle cure.
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Melissa: This women say, they put Alzheimer’s disease in reverse. Lois Walsh: It does really help my memory. Sherry Fennell: It’s just given me my mom back really. Felicia McColl: This is really help. Melissa: This was Rose Oliver a few months ago. Female: Can you count to ten? Hey, look at me. One, and then what? Melissa: Six weeks later. Rose: One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten. Edward Tobinick: We actually have seen the effects very quickly within a few minutes. Melissa: Dr. Edward Tobinick, uses Etanercept, a drug approved for arthritis to do more than heal aching joints. Edward Tobinick: We do this by injecting it to the back of the neck. Melissa: He refused to allow cameras inside. Edward Tobinick: We tilt the patients upside down, we leave them upside them or inclined on an examination table for about five minutes and what we believe happens is that blood flow in this venous system reverses. Melissa: Dr. Tobinick says the injection targets a protein in the brain that causes inflammation. Some pay $800.00 per shot and more than $40,000.00 a year. Mark Brody: I wouldn’t do this if it was my mother and I like my mother. Melissa: Dr. Mark Brody says there are no large clinical trials, long-term studies or animal experiments to back up the claims. Mark Brody: I reported almost immediate results. It takes highly active imagination in my opinion. Melissa: In a six months study, 15 Alzheimer’s patients were given weekly injections, the majority showed improvement. 70-year-old Lois Walsh suffers from moderate Alzheimer’s and now travels more than 2000 miles to get the injection every month. Lois Walsh: If I can help one other person, I’m going to help him because I feel like I’ve been helped so much. Melissa: Amazing results or a treatment, too good to be true, this patients say they don’t have time to wait for the verdict. I’m Melissa reporting.

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