Learn how estrogen's not just for menopausal women anymore. Doctors say estrogen therapy may hold hidden benefits for men.
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Jennifer Matthews: Robert and Gisela Morrison have been married for forty-two years. Robert Morrison: We met in Germany when I was in the Air Force. Jennifer Matthews: Life has brought interesting people into their lives by way of Gisela's autograph collection. Their picture perfect life changed, though, three years ago when Robert found out he had prostate cancer. Gisela Morrison: It was devastating. It was terrible. I mean, like the whole world was falling in. Jennifer Matthews: Robert had surgery. Doctors then suppressed his hormones to prevent the cancer from returning. Urologist Peter Albertsen from U-Conn Health Center says short-term effects are hot flashes and loss of stamina. It's the long-term effects, like osteoporosis, that concern him. Dr. Peter Albertsen: The impact of osteoporosis over time is fracture, both fractures of the spine, compression fractures, and fracture of the hip. Jennifer Matthews: He recently conducted a study giving prostate cancer patients estrogen. The goal was to stop bone loss. Robert later realized that it had other benefits. Dr. Robert Morrison: As soon as the study was over, where I was taking the pill, the hot flashes came back like gangbusters. Jennifer Matthews: Now Robert hopes it can also boost his energy so he can devote more time to the hobbies he enjoys. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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