Erectile dysfunction makes for a lot of cheesy commercials and frustrating situations in the bedroom. But, romantic failure may not be the most serious thing to worry about. A new study from the New England Research Institutes shows men with erect...
Read the full transcript »

Erectile Dysfunction Might be an Early Sign of Heart Disease Andrew Holtz: You’ve seen the ads but rheumatic failure may not be the most serious thing to worry about, erectile dysfunction maybe a warning sign of cardiovascular disease including heart attack and stroke. It makes sense that erectile dysfunction and heart disease might be connected because they both have to do with how well blood vessels are working. A number of studies have made this connection. With the authors of the latest study wanted to find out though was whether erectile dysfunction might improve the accuracy of risk predictions that are based on traditional risk factors such as smoking, high blood pressure, and family history. They published the results of calculating heart disease risk factors for over a thousand middle-age in older men in the journal of the American College of Cardiology. And while erectile dysfunction does point to increased heart disease risk, it doesn’t make those predictions any more precise than the usual methods and that’s frustrating because so many men fall into a middle range of risk. So it’s hard for doctors to pick out the ones who would really benefit the most from aggressive measures to reduce risk. Although the researchers were disappointed that adding erectile dysfunction to heart disease risk formulas didn’t help them predict the future anymore clearly. They say knowing about trouble in the bedroom might still save lives. Dr. Andre Araujo: ED can be assessed very easily okay. So when a patient comes in and presents with erectile dysfunction or ED, the health professionals seeing that patient should work the patient up for CVD as there maybe I think a window of opportunity for men to improve their health. Andrew Holtz: Men don’t like to go to the doctor, right guys? Behavioral health expert Dr. James Mol that’s typical. Dr. James Mol: Very strong viral man, the rugged healthy man doesn’t need to be screaming and worrying and fussing about their health. If they feel good their health is fine. It might be a typical way of looking at things. Andrew Holtz: Men tend to wait until something is really wrong and well what could be more wrong than failure to perform. So the researchers who are building evidence about how often erectile dysfunction and heart disease go together say that when a guy comes to his doc asking for help resurrecting that honeymoon, instead of just reaching for the prescription pad, they should also look for a heart that might be about to break.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement